A LONG MARCH

A LONG MARCH

The documentary film A LONG MARCH is the revealing look at how the United States conscripted Filipino American forces to defeat WWII Axis powers – then systematically denied these veterans the rights and benefits promised for honorable service based on race and gender. Our film follows three of these veterans

A LONG MARCH

The documentary film A LONG MARCH is the revealing look at how the United States conscripted Filipino American forces to defeat WWII Axis powers – then systematically denied these veterans the rights and benefits promised for honorable service based on race and gender. Our film follows three of these veterans as they trace their paths from betrayal to fighting back at the gates of the White House to the steps of Congress in search of promises denied. Can they succeed before they are all dead? WHY THIS FILM? Few Americans know that the Philippines was seized as a colony of the US, or that during World War II President Roosevelt conscripted the forces of the Philippines into the US Army. Fewer, still, know that the US Congress denied these Filipino veterans benefits promised them for their sacrifice by declaring them “not on active duty.” Over 1.2 million people claim they served. Less than 20% were added to the official roster and women were explicitly excluded. A LONG MARCH seeks to rehabilitate the narrative of WWII to include all of our veterans. Join us in our impact campaign to share this history with educational institutions, museums, and comunity organizations across America as we lock arms with advocates to recognize our veterans and work to repeal the racist law that still plagues us today.

About the Organization:

The documentary film A LONG MARCH is the revealing look at how the United States conscripted Filipino American forces to defeat WWII Axis powers – then systematically denied these veterans the rights and benefits promised for honorable service based on race and gender. Our film follows three of these veterans as they trace their paths from betrayal to fighting back at the gates of the White House to the steps of Congress in search of promises denied. Can they succeed before they are all dead? WHY THIS FILM? Few Americans know that the Philippines was seized as a colony of the US, or that during World War II President Roosevelt conscripted the forces of the Philippines into the US Army. Fewer, still, know that the US Congress denied these Filipino veterans benefits promised them for their sacrifice by declaring them “not on active duty.” Over 1.2 million people claim they served. Less than 20% were added to the official roster and women were explicitly excluded. A LONG MARCH seeks to rehabilitate the narrative of WWII to include all of our veterans. Join us in our impact campaign to share this history with educational institutions, museums, and comunity organizations across America as we lock arms with advocates to recognize our veterans and work to repeal the racist law that still plagues us today.

organizational budget

$0 - $50,000

existence for

0-5 Years

The Issue:

Anti-Asian hate is at an all-time high in the US. Why? Partly because we do not know our history. Most people in the US don’t know that the Philippines was once our colony or that the seizure of the independent Philippines in 1899 was a brutal act bordering on genocide. We don’t know that when wartime came in 1941, the US conscripted Filipino men and women into US Armed Forces of the Far East. Post war, we ceded the Philippines their independence on July 4, 1946, but not before we further betrayed those who served through an Act of Congress that was steeped in racist policies, denying recognition, pay, and citizenship to about a million men and women with affidavits of service. Americans do not know this history because our government is good at suppressing its imperialist and racist past. A LONG MARCH exposes the problem today, as elderly veterans who served are dying without access to pensions, healthcare, or death benefits given their White counterparts. More wounding to these veterans is that they, and their contributions, have been erased from American history. In the minds of Americans, they do not exist. 75 years after WWII, Filipino-Americans are banning together with grassroots organizations to heal this wound via education and recognition programs while continuing the call to repeal the Acts of Congress that erased their contribution. They do this against a 30-year history of broken-down judicial solutions and 23 years of putting forth bills that go into Congressional committee and die there. In this film, we unflinchingly show the history of the relationship between the US and Philippines that led to this mess. We expose the racist policies, which also explicitly erased Filipino women from history, and we ask the hard question: does America really believe in the values it says it does and will veterans receive the recognition they deserve before they are all dead? 1898

The Solution:

A Long March is the first feature length apologetic to the American public that exposes US Army policies which are deemed unconstitutional, and which calls Congress into accountability for the racial bias and human rights violation of the Rescission Acts of 1946, as well as demand that the VA knock loose $50-million in funds earmarked for these veterans before it is too late. This film includes feature length and educational versions, an education guide, and a Continued Learning Education course for attorneys, which dovetail into existing advocacy initiatives to educate the public on this topic and to recognize these veterans once and for all. We are partnered with grassroots organizations to deliver this film to educational institutions, museums, and our communities to create the groundswell necessary to drive change in our national narrative of WWII and to recognize these heroes of WWII as they deserve. This film was awarded the Better Angels Lavine Fellowship (Ken Burns) and has been invited to air on PBS member stations across the country. We’ve also received multiple offers for international distribution and are working on how to include all of these facets in a Social Impact Campaign. Most of our elements are aligned, including having a virtual platform for screening, but we need funding to make this film more widely available to schools and organizations that are unable to meet licensing fees and to cover our ongoing costs for speaking engagements at schools and in communities.

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