Angel Island Immigration Station Foundation

Angel Island Immigration Station Foundation

AIISF is the primary nonprofit organization working in collaboration with Angel Island State Park to preserve the buildings at the former US Immigration Station at Angel Island and to uplift its histories and stories. During the years that the station was open from 1910-1940, the site was used to detain,

Angel Island Immigration Station Foundation

AIISF is the primary nonprofit organization working in collaboration with Angel Island State Park to preserve the buildings at the former US Immigration Station at Angel Island and to uplift its histories and stories. During the years that the station was open from 1910-1940, the site was used to detain, interrogate, and quarantine over 500,000 persons from 80 different countries (primarily Asian and Pacific Islander countries due to the nation’s exclusionary immigration policies like the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882).

About the Organization:

AIISF is the primary nonprofit organization working in collaboration with Angel Island State Park to preserve the buildings at the former US Immigration Station at Angel Island and to uplift its histories and stories. During the years that the station was open from 1910-1940, the site was used to detain, interrogate, and quarantine over 500,000 persons from 80 different countries (primarily Asian and Pacific Islander countries due to the nation’s exclusionary immigration policies like the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882).

organizational budget

$100,000 - $500,000

existence for

31+ YEARS

The Issue:

Author and Activist Helen Zia often talks about how our communities are MIH – missing in history. Indeed, many of us never learned I school about the dark history of exclusionary immigration through Angel Island, the overthrow of the Hawaiian monarchy, the impact of nuclear testing in the Marshall Islands, and other events and key figures in Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander history. Early this year, Illinois became the first state to require Asian American history be taught as part of its public school curriculum. It may take years to pass similar legislation across all 50 states. But given the continuing anti-Asian racism and xenophobia, can we afford to wait that long? If understanding history is an important first step to build allyship, how might we catalyze this increased understanding and empathy among youth and adults? Thus, AIISF is excited to propose this AANHPI Animated History Project.

The Solution:

The project will contribute to the development of a series of brief, animated videos (imagine an AANHPI-focused “School House Rock” series) to spark awareness and dialog. These videos will help address the lack of basic AANHPI histories and contexts and provide fun and engaging (yet critical and educational) tools that can be used by all of us, our allies, our teachers, employee resource groups, and others. Watching a few videos will likely not be enough to sway hearts and minds. Thus, a key part of the project is also focused on forming a community partners circle of individuals, families, and organizations who commit to hosting at least one (but hopefully more) in-person or virtual watch party and conversation. Imagine the impact of hundreds (or even thousands) of conversations happening at dinner tables, classrooms, staff meetings, across the country that bring together friends, family, and perhaps even strangers across the country.

Get Updates about the Gold Futures Challenge

Join our email list to receive challenge updates!