Asian American Drug Abuse Program, Inc.

Asian American Drug Abuse Program, Inc.

AADAP upholds a value of cultural humility, offering services in 12-different languages, person-centered care, and ability to assist anyone wherever they’re located. On top of our culturally competent services, AADAP integrates holistic approaches within our family-based care model. AADAP also uses evidence-based interventions such as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), Motivational

Asian American Drug Abuse Program, Inc.

Since 1972, AADAP began with the mission to improve community health through providing prevention education, treating substance abuse, and facilitating economic development to increase job skills and employment opportunities. Our programs have expanded to include HIV/AIDS outreach, Drug Court Services for the Inglewood Municipal Courts, tobacco education, and a for-profit business venture, MTC Construction. AADAP upholds a value of cultural humility, offering services in 12-different languages, person-centered care, and ability to assist anyone wherever they’re located. On top of our culturally competent services, AADAP integrates holistic approaches within our family-based care model. AADAP also uses evidence-based interventions such as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), Motivational Interviewing (MI), Contingency Management (CM), and Trauma Informed Care (TIC) from prevention to harm-reduction to intervention. Additional services include, substance use prevention and mental health capacity service deliveries. AADAP Inc. has been accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) International since 2014. CARF International is an independent, nonprofit organization that sets rigorous and comprehensive guidelines for governance, fiscal responsibility along with standards of care. Service providers who are CARF-accredited have earned the recognition for their compliance with the company’s leading-edge set of standards from business practice to service delivery. CARF accreditation is the official industry designation that recognizes service standards as well as best practices which AADAP has proudly upheld the meticulous standards and maintenance process throughout the agency. Much has changed since those early AADAP days, but one thing that remains is AADAP’s motto and philosophy: “People Need People.”

About the Organization:

Since 1972, AADAP began with the mission to improve community health through providing prevention education, treating substance abuse, and facilitating economic development to increase job skills and employment opportunities. Our programs have expanded to include HIV/AIDS outreach, Drug Court Services for the Inglewood Municipal Courts, tobacco education, and a for-profit business venture, MTC Construction. AADAP upholds a value of cultural humility, offering services in 12-different languages, person-centered care, and ability to assist anyone wherever they’re located. On top of our culturally competent services, AADAP integrates holistic approaches within our family-based care model. AADAP also uses evidence-based interventions such as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), Motivational Interviewing (MI), Contingency Management (CM), and Trauma Informed Care (TIC) from prevention to harm-reduction to intervention. Additional services include, substance use prevention and mental health capacity service deliveries. AADAP Inc. has been accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) International since 2014. CARF International is an independent, nonprofit organization that sets rigorous and comprehensive guidelines for governance, fiscal responsibility along with standards of care. Service providers who are CARF-accredited have earned the recognition for their compliance with the company’s leading-edge set of standards from business practice to service delivery. CARF accreditation is the official industry designation that recognizes service standards as well as best practices which AADAP has proudly upheld the meticulous standards and maintenance process throughout the agency. Much has changed since those early AADAP days, but one thing that remains is AADAP’s motto and philosophy: “People Need People.”

organizational budget

8 MILLION - 15 MILLION

existence for

31+ YEARS

Organization benefits AAPIs residing in the following state(s):

California

organizational budget

8 MILLION - 15 MILLION

existence for

31+ YEARS

Organization benefits AAPIs residing in the following state(s):

California

The Issue:

The Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) community in California is facing significant challenges and issues in relation to drug abuse and rehabilitation. A study conducted by the California Department of Public Health found that drug overdose deaths among AAPI individuals have been steadily increasing. Between 2010 and 2018, drug overdose deaths among AAPI Californians rose by 66%. These alarming statistics highlight the urgent need for targeted interventions and culturally competent rehabilitation services within the community. Language barriers and cultural stigmas present formidable obstacles to accessing drug rehabilitation services. According to the Asian Health Services, a community health center in Oakland, California, nearly 70% of AAPI individuals seeking substance abuse treatment face language barriers that hinder their access to care. This linguistic disparity often results in limited awareness about available resources and treatment options, exacerbating the challenges faced by AAPI individuals seeking help. Moreover, the model minority myth places significant pressure on AAPI individuals, contributing to psychological stress and potentially leading to substance abuse. A study published in the Journal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse revealed that AAPI youth in California face unique stressors related to academic expectations, family obligations, and cultural assimilation, which can increase the likelihood of substance abuse. This indicates the complex interplay between cultural factors and substance abuse within the AAPI community. Additionally, the lack of comprehensive data on drug abuse within specific AAPI subgroups further hampers efforts to address the issue effectively. For instance, the California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) reported that aggregated data often masks disparities between AAPI subgroups, making it challenging to develop targeted prevention and treatment strategies. Subgroup-specific data is crucial to understand the diverse needs and experiences within the AAPI community and develop tailored approaches to rehabilitation. To address these challenges, developing and implementing culturally competent programs that address language barriers, cultural stigmas, and the specific needs of different AAPI subgroups is imperative. By investing in linguistically accessible resources, community outreach initiatives, and mental health support, AADAP can provide more effective drug rehabilitation services to the AAPI community in South Los Angeles, ultimately promoting recovery and well-being within the community.

The Solution:

AADAP’s approach to treatment embodies and embraces the Hawaiian concept of Ohana. The origin of the word can be seen in two parts “the ‘ohā is the shoot of the plant, which can be cut to grow a new plant, and ana is a word that conveys “regeneration.” ‘ However, the more traditional concept of the word implies the extended family and community that helps support and regenerates the individual. Employing the holistic approach to drug and rehabilitation, AADAP embraces those who need treatment as family, welcoming them into the community and giving them the support necessary. The holistic approach recognizes that individuals are multifaceted beings influenced by various factors such as cultural background, family dynamics, and socio-economic circumstances. By considering these elements, it acknowledges that drug addiction and rehabilitation are complex issues that require personalized and culturally sensitive interventions. By acknowledging the individual, the holistic approach fosters a comprehensive understanding of drug addiction as a health issue rather than a moral failing or a character flaw. Destigmatizing substance abuse and treating it as a medical condition, individuals are more likely to seek help and receive the support they need. This approach promotes empathy, reduces shame, and encourages open conversations about addiction within minority communities, challenging the model minority myth that suggests perfection and invulnerability. Moreover, the holistic approach recognizes that rehabilitation should not solely focus on addressing the physical symptoms of addiction. It encompasses a range of supportive services, including mental health counseling, family therapy, community involvement, and reintegration programs, regenerating the individual. This multidimensional approach recognizes that recovery requires addressing underlying psychological, emotional, and social factors contributing to addiction. By providing a comprehensive support system, it increases the chances of successful rehabilitation and long-term recovery. Additionally, the importance of community involvement and empowerment encourages the participation of minority communities in shaping the rehabilitation process, as they possess unique insights into their own needs and challenges. By empowering individuals and communities, it promotes ownership and accountability in combating substance abuse, breaking free from the confines of the model minority stereotype, and fostering healthier, more inclusive societies.

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