Asian American Liberation Network

Asian American Liberation Network

Asian American Liberation Network has fostered strong relationships with communities and leaders in Sacramento and surrounding counties, prioritizing equity by listening to the communities closest to the pain, and we are well-positioned to deliver services in culturally and linguistically appropriate ways. We have leveraged existing relationships and trusted messengers to

Asian American Liberation Network

Asian American Liberation Network has fostered strong relationships with communities and leaders in Sacramento and surrounding counties, prioritizing equity by listening to the communities closest to the pain, and we are well-positioned to deliver services in culturally and linguistically appropriate ways. We have leveraged existing relationships and trusted messengers to tap qualified and appropriate resources, empowering communities to build a comprehensive and effective response to addressing hate and violence. The Network directly addresses the rise of Anti-Asian hate and violence in our communities by prioritizing anti-racism programs and community activation. To effectively advocate for the AA&PI community, we collaborated to assemble and disseminate policy briefs to community leaders and elected officials on regional data and statistics on hate/violence incidents and crimes. In September 2020, we organized and hosted a virtual public town hall and webinar called “Showing Up,” featuring AA&PI community and civic leaders, California Senator Richard Pan, and City of Sacramento Councilmember Mai Vang to address the rise of anti-Asian hate and violence. In 2021, AALN co-facilitated conversations with local community-based organizations through a series of anti-Asian hate community convenings hosted by City of Sacramento councilmembers. The convenings served as a space for education, highlighting systemic racism in the region, current efforts to address anti-Asian hate, and discussing the gaps in services. These multi-racial convenings helped strengthen efforts and identify actions needed to foster cross-racial solidarity, equity, and community healing in Sacramento. As an organization built on partnership and collaboration, we are proud to participate in the Northern California Stop the Hate Collaborative – a network of organizations working together to ensure a comprehensive and effective approach to address racism and violence in our region. We work in solidarity and unity to end hate and violence fueled by the United States’ history of white supremacy, systemic racism, and gender-based violence. Our collaborative builds awareness about anti-Asian hate and violence, promotes the safe reporting of incidents, provides community-informed safety programs, and offers direct services to victims and survivors. Since our formation, AALN has received support from numerous individuals, foundations, corporations, the City of Sacramento and the State of California.

About the Organization:

Asian American Liberation Network has fostered strong relationships with communities and leaders in Sacramento and surrounding counties, prioritizing equity by listening to the communities closest to the pain, and we are well-positioned to deliver services in culturally and linguistically appropriate ways. We have leveraged existing relationships and trusted messengers to tap qualified and appropriate resources, empowering communities to build a comprehensive and effective response to addressing hate and violence. The Network directly addresses the rise of Anti-Asian hate and violence in our communities by prioritizing anti-racism programs and community activation. To effectively advocate for the AA&PI community, we collaborated to assemble and disseminate policy briefs to community leaders and elected officials on regional data and statistics on hate/violence incidents and crimes. In September 2020, we organized and hosted a virtual public town hall and webinar called “Showing Up,” featuring AA&PI community and civic leaders, California Senator Richard Pan, and City of Sacramento Councilmember Mai Vang to address the rise of anti-Asian hate and violence. In 2021, AALN co-facilitated conversations with local community-based organizations through a series of anti-Asian hate community convenings hosted by City of Sacramento councilmembers. The convenings served as a space for education, highlighting systemic racism in the region, current efforts to address anti-Asian hate, and discussing the gaps in services. These multi-racial convenings helped strengthen efforts and identify actions needed to foster cross-racial solidarity, equity, and community healing in Sacramento. As an organization built on partnership and collaboration, we are proud to participate in the Northern California Stop the Hate Collaborative – a network of organizations working together to ensure a comprehensive and effective approach to address racism and violence in our region. We work in solidarity and unity to end hate and violence fueled by the United States’ history of white supremacy, systemic racism, and gender-based violence. Our collaborative builds awareness about anti-Asian hate and violence, promotes the safe reporting of incidents, provides community-informed safety programs, and offers direct services to victims and survivors. Since our formation, AALN has received support from numerous individuals, foundations, corporations, the City of Sacramento and the State of California.

organizational budget

$100,000 - $500,000

existence for

0-5 Years

Organization benefits AAPIs residing in the following state(s):

California

organizational budget

$100,000 - $500,000

existence for

0-5 Years

Organization benefits AAPIs residing in the following state(s):

California

The Issue:

California’s Sacramento County has experienced an unceasing rise of anti-Asian hate and violence. According to the Bulosan Center for Filipino Studies, the cases of anti-Asian hate in the greater Sacramento region included a break-in at the Sacramento chapter of the Chinese-American Soo Yuen Benevolent Association. In the Rocklin Unified School District, an anonymous Instagram account sent hate messages to Chinese students. A teacher from Grant High School stretched her eyes out and spouted racist taunts to her students over Zoom. Over 6,600 incidents of COVID-19 related discrimination were reported to the Stop AAPI Hate reporting center since the beginning of the pandemic. From March 2020 to February 2021, 66 of these incidents happened in the Placer, Yolo, El Dorado, and Sacramento counties. Incidents have occurred in schools, businesses, and public areas, and on public transit. The majority of reported hate incidents came from Sacramento County, with 66.67% of incidents, followed by Yolo county (16.67%), Placer county (10.61%), and El Dorado county (6.06%). A majority of discrimination victims reported being subject to verbal harassment, where racially charged comments were made directly to them or said in passing. 63.6% of the reported discriminatory acts were conducted verbally, followed by acts of shunning at 19.7%. Discrimination primarily occurred in business areas, with 40.9% of recorded incidences. Public areas such as streets and sidewalks comprised 15.2% of recorded incidents. Notably, 93.9% of the reports stated that race was the main suspected reason for this targeting, and 65.2% believed harassment was due to their ethnicity. Correspondingly, 37.9% of respondents identified as Chinese, followed by 15.2% who identified as Hmong. A majority of reported incidents came from the 26-35 age group, comprising 28.8% of responses. Respondents aged 46-60 were second, making up 21.2%. Women were over 2.5x more likely to be targeted compared to men, with 71.2% of respondents identifying as female and 27.1% identifying as male. Additionally, 19.7% of respondents felt that they were discriminated against due to their gender. While the number of reported incidents is high, this data may still be an underrepresentation, as many more incidences are likely to be unreported.

The Solution:

To address of anti-Asian hate and violence, and focusing on those directly impacted by these incidents, AALN hopes to establish a culturally appropriate Asian American community mental health initiative, as well as to incorporate strong, community-driven and culturally informed research, tracking and data that help inform programming and future Asian American targeted initiatives. In order to establish a culturally appropriate Asian American community mental health initiative, we will partner with licensed clinicians from the Filipino community to promote well-being and serve survivors of anti-Asian hate and violence. Objectives for this effort will be to: Conduct a mental health landscape analysis and needs assessment to identify community partners, resources, and gaps in services. Provide free therapy sessions to community members who have no or limited access to culturally responsive treatment, and extend services to the larger Asian American communities to build an Asian American-focused community mental health initiative. Conduct a series of community-focused mental health educational and outreach workshops to reach community members. Establish a mental health services fund to ensure sustainability and provide free one-on-one counseling services and/or group therapy facilitation for target communities. AALN values measurable impact, and to continue advancing our mission, we will also seek to incorporate strong, community-driven and culturally informed research, tracking and data that help inform programming and future Asian American targeted initiatives. To do this, we will produce various policy briefs on anti-Asian hate and violence for dissemination at the local and state level to highlight the impact of anti-Asian hate. Additionally, we will create culturally-appropriate feedback opportunities through surveys and qualitative feedback opportunities and reports for project participants to create data points in the Sacramento Asian American community.

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