Asian American Writers’ Workshop

Asian American Writers’ Workshop

The Asian American Writers' Workshop is dedicated to amplifying Asian American literary culture. We produce one of the country's most vibrant series of literary events; we incubate emerging writers through two fellowship programs that provide material support and unparalleled guidance and mentorship; we publish original works in the Margins, our

Asian American Writers’ Workshop

The Asian American Writers' Workshop is dedicated to amplifying Asian American literary culture. We produce one of the country's most vibrant series of literary events; we incubate emerging writers through two fellowship programs that provide material support and unparalleled guidance and mentorship; we publish original works in the Margins, our digital magazine of arts and ideas; and we organize community workshops in high schools and senior centers throughout New York City. Since our founding in 1991, we have worked to cultivate a radically inclusive community of Asian and Asian diasporic writers and readers to mobilize for a more just future.

About the Organization:

The Asian American Writers' Workshop is dedicated to amplifying Asian American literary culture. We produce one of the country's most vibrant series of literary events; we incubate emerging writers through two fellowship programs that provide material support and unparalleled guidance and mentorship; we publish original works in the Margins, our digital magazine of arts and ideas; and we organize community workshops in high schools and senior centers throughout New York City. Since our founding in 1991, we have worked to cultivate a radically inclusive community of Asian and Asian diasporic writers and readers to mobilize for a more just future.

organizational budget

$1 MILLION - $2 MILLION

existence for

26-30 YEARS

The Issue:

The story goes that the Asian American Writers’ Workshop (AAWW) first took shape in 1991 in a Greek diner in New York City’s East Village. AAWW’s co-founders Curtis Chin, Christina Chiu, Marie Myung-Ok Lee, and Bino A. Realuyo began meeting with other Asian American writers, all of whom were in search of a supportive community in the New York City literary world for writers of color. Together, they established AAWW as a not-for-profit organization and published the first issue of The Asian Pacific American Journal, AAWW’s first print publication. To put it plainly: representation is not enough. Faced with the challenges of traditional literary circles that felt exclusionary and inaccessible, AAWW founders sought to create an organization rooted in the belief in the power of community. Together, we are telling our stories on our own terms and creating the next generation of Asian American literary superstars.

The Solution:

We seek support from the Gold Futures Challenge to help us continue to deliver some of the most vital and impactful programming that amplifies Asian and Asian diasporic storytelling and creates the next generation of Asian American literary culture. Supported programs will include:
EVENTS
We will hold at least 40 events featuring at least 100 writers of color. Recordings of every event will be archived on our YouTube channel for future viewing.
EDITORIAL/THE MARGINS
We will publish at least 100 works of poetry, fiction, reportage, and essays in The Margins, our digital magazine of arts and ideas.
COMMUNITY WORKSHOPS/CREATE NOW
We will arrange for teaching artists to lead community workshops in up to 10 high schools and senior centers throughout New York City, creating a cross-generational artistic community.

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