Asian Pacific Institute on Gender-Based Violence

Asian Pacific Institute on Gender-Based Violence

The Asian Pacific Institute on Gender-Based Violence (API-GBV) is a national resource center on domestic violence, sexual violence, trafficking, and other forms of gender-based violence in Asian/Asian-American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) communities. Our mission is to disrupt gender-based violence, which causes physical, sexual, emotional, spiritual, and economic harm within AAPI

Asian Pacific Institute on Gender-Based Violence

The Asian Pacific Institute on Gender-Based Violence (API-GBV) is a national resource center on domestic violence, sexual violence, trafficking, and other forms of gender-based violence in Asian/Asian-American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) communities. Our mission is to disrupt gender-based violence, which causes physical, sexual, emotional, spiritual, and economic harm within AAPI communities throughout the U.S. and its territories. We envision a world free of gender-based violence for communities with equal opportunities for all. We work within AAPI communities to uplift the voices and experiences of the AAPI communities who are impacted by violence; build capacity through training and technical support for those organizations that serve our communities; engage allied communities and systems to create shifts in gendered cultural norms and address injustices; educate our communities to mobilize them to prevent gender-based violence; and advocate for policies and practices that ensure access to essential rights and services. Our programs focus on research, language access, capacity building, policy work, and immigration. We provide policy analysis, research and data support, and effective communication. API-GBV is anchored in the activism of the early 1980s when AAPI advocates, survivors, and leaders in the battered women’s movement struggled to address the problem of domestic violence in their ethnic communities. In 2000, the Asian & Pacific Islander Institute on Domestic Violence was funded as a project of the Asian & Pacific Island American Health Forum. In 2014, the Institute spun off to become API-GBV, an independent organization with an expanded vision.

About the Organization:

The Asian Pacific Institute on Gender-Based Violence (API-GBV) is a national resource center on domestic violence, sexual violence, trafficking, and other forms of gender-based violence in Asian/Asian-American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) communities. Our mission is to disrupt gender-based violence, which causes physical, sexual, emotional, spiritual, and economic harm within AAPI communities throughout the U.S. and its territories. We envision a world free of gender-based violence for communities with equal opportunities for all. We work within AAPI communities to uplift the voices and experiences of the AAPI communities who are impacted by violence; build capacity through training and technical support for those organizations that serve our communities; engage allied communities and systems to create shifts in gendered cultural norms and address injustices; educate our communities to mobilize them to prevent gender-based violence; and advocate for policies and practices that ensure access to essential rights and services. Our programs focus on research, language access, capacity building, policy work, and immigration. We provide policy analysis, research and data support, and effective communication. API-GBV is anchored in the activism of the early 1980s when AAPI advocates, survivors, and leaders in the battered women’s movement struggled to address the problem of domestic violence in their ethnic communities. In 2000, the Asian & Pacific Islander Institute on Domestic Violence was funded as a project of the Asian & Pacific Island American Health Forum. In 2014, the Institute spun off to become API-GBV, an independent organization with an expanded vision.

organizational budget

8 MILLION - 15 MILLION

existence for

21-25 YEARS

The Issue:

The Asian American and Pacific Islander community across the United States is reeling from escalated levels of anti-Asian hate and violence. The intersection of racism, misogyny, and xenophobia has been showing up exponentially in the violence the AAPI community has been experiencing over the last few years [1], with the March 2021 killings in Atlanta, GA, of 7 women of Asian descent being a pinnacle illustration of how gender-based violence and extreme xenophobia intersect. Amidst this backdrop, survivor advocates continue to tirelessly lead the way in enhancing safety in their communities, as they have done for decades, in partnership with AAPI survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault. There are currently over 160 programs created by and for Asian and Pacific Islander survivors spanning all U.S. regions with expertise on enhancing individual and community safety for AAPI survivors and their families. AAPI programs are effective in addressing immediate community and survivor needs; however, the experiences of AAPI survivors and the systemic barriers they face accessing critical services have been largely unacknowledged by policymakers and government funders. AAPI programs have long struggled to maintain continuous engagement in the political process to expand options for survivors of domestic violence or sexual assault. Already working with limited resources to respond to the complex needs of survivors, advocates seldom have an opportunity to connect and mobilize their collective voices to change harmful policies and influence the funding landscape to support their work. Although organizing around domestic and sexual violence has been central to the activism and leadership of AAPI women across the U.S., the national mobilization and advocacy infrastructure to promote the policy needs of AAPI survivors is limited. Most collaborations among programs have been sporadic or ad hoc. This results in a lack of advancement of policies that benefit AAPI survivors of domestic or sexual violence, a lack of media communications to shift the public narrative on AAPI women, and inadequate funding for culturally specific services that meet the need of AAPI communities. [1] https://www.napawf.org/assets/download/napawf-state-of-safety-report.pdf

The Solution:

Support for women’s and immigrant communities’ needs are often overlooked and face under-investment. We propose to engage AAPI domestic violence and sexual assault survivor advocates across the nation to advance policies and investments that positively benefit survivors and their communities. We seek to leverage the expertise of programs to impact policy changes, reduce silos among advocate networks, and advance a collaborative policy agenda. Our policy team receives ongoing requests for technical assistance and training on policy issues, and we hope to respond to this need and strengthen the capacity of AAPI advocates at organizations nationwide to be better equipped to engage in policy advocacy. Connecting advocates is a starting point for building a cohesive strategy to influence decision-makers. API-GBV will convene AAPI survivor advocates to connect, share strategies, learn from one another’s lived experiences, and influence decision-makers. These convenings will help transform shared learnings into the basis for actionable steps to influence federal and state policies that impact AAPI survivors. In addition, API-GBV will strengthen the policy advocacy capacity of programs by implementing a Rapid Response and Communications strategy to provide information for advocates to support a timely response to emerging national policy issues. API-GBV will identify and create opportunities for AAPI advocates to participate in national policy events to ensure that the needs of AAPI survivors are included during important deliberations tied to issues such as immigration, funding for culturally specific programs, language access, housing, criminal legal reform, economic supports and other issues impacting the safety and wellbeing of AAPI survivors. Our approach and activities will include: (i) convening advocates virtually or in person, on a biennial basis, to strengthen and deepen collaborations among them and to identify, prioritize, and develop positions on issues in national policy conversations; (ii) collaborating with advocates to develop messaging and tools to influence systems; (iii) expanding opportunities for advocates to understand legislative and federal mechanisms to inform their policy advocacy; and (iv) identifying and bringing advocates to meet with leaders in Congress and federal agencies to speak about issues that impact AAPI domestic violence and sexual assault survivors and their communities.

Get Updates about the Gold Futures Challenge

Join our email list to receive challenge updates!