Asians and Pacific Islanders with Disabilities of California (APIDC)

Asians and Pacific Islanders with Disabilities of California (APIDC)

APIDC provides a voice and face to AAPIs with disabilities. We create platforms for our often invisible members of our community to be heard and seen, provide tools for empowerment and opportunities to unite in shared experiences and advocacy goals. We provide youth leadership training, resource sharing, advocacy and networking

Asians and Pacific Islanders with Disabilities of California (APIDC)

APIDC provides a voice and face to AAPIs with disabilities. We create platforms for our often invisible members of our community to be heard and seen, provide tools for empowerment and opportunities to unite in shared experiences and advocacy goals. We provide youth leadership training, resource sharing, advocacy and networking opportunities. We host statewide conferences for people with disabilities, service providers, researchers, public policy shapers, and employers; job preparedness workshops, networking events, and webinars. Our young adults with disabilities are integral to the design, marketing and implementation of our programs.

About the Organization:

APIDC provides a voice and face to AAPIs with disabilities. We create platforms for our often invisible members of our community to be heard and seen, provide tools for empowerment and opportunities to unite in shared experiences and advocacy goals. We provide youth leadership training, resource sharing, advocacy and networking opportunities. We host statewide conferences for people with disabilities, service providers, researchers, public policy shapers, and employers; job preparedness workshops, networking events, and webinars. Our young adults with disabilities are integral to the design, marketing and implementation of our programs.

organizational budget

$100,000 - $500,000

existence for

21-25 YEARS

The Issue:

AAPIs with disabilities will remain invisible without strategies to break down cultural and societal stigma barriers, and the model minority myth. Through our research the following sentiment is common among AAPIs with physical disabilities: “I feel more welcome in a shopping mall outside of Chinatown because I know I will not be stared at; I will not feel ashamed”. An often heard statement from young adult AAPIs with mental illness: “I do not talk about my learning disabilities at home. My parents do not understand. They just say, ‘study harder.’” The pandemic has compounded these issues of isolation. Mainstream Americans, foundations and corporations do not think about AAPIs when it comes to supporting people with disabilities due to the model minority myth. We need ways to reach families to remove the stigma, raise awareness within and outside of our AAPI communities of the challenges faced by AAPIs with disabilities.

The Solution:

Our project is to use the universal languages of music and dance for AAPIs to be Seen, Heard, Empowered and United . We propose a concert series entitled “MUSE: An Abilities Roadshow.” Each concert will feature AAPI musicians and dancers with disabilities performing traditional (e.g., taiko) and contemporary (e.g., hip hop) genres to attract a multi-generational audience. Our goal is to promote family support for young AAPIs with disabilities. Graduates of our Youth Leadership Institute will help produce, perform and emcee each concert. Graduates will be pan-AAPI and represent different types of disabilities. This is a unique platform--other than a previous similar concert which APIDC hosted; we’re unaware of any other concerts featuring AAPIs with disabilities. The concerts will also feature information booths about parent support networks, government programs and student services--including our APIDC programs at Pasadena City College and Rio Hondo College.

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