AsianWeek

AsianWeek

The AsianWeek Foundation was founded in 2004 as a legacy project of AsianWeek to do community work. Now, the AsianWeek Foundation makes the articles of AsianWeek the legacy, by creating the AsianWeek Database.

AsianWeek

The AsianWeek Foundation was founded in 2004 as a legacy project of AsianWeek to do community work. Now, the AsianWeek Foundation makes the articles of AsianWeek the legacy, by creating the AsianWeek Database. The AsianWeek Foundation is an established and certified non-profit 501c3 corporation. It has operated new and powerful initiatives bringing together the diversity of the Asian American community. Past projects include the Hep B Free campaign to end the biggest health disparity for all Asians; the Asian Heritage Street Celebration, the largest annual outdoor gathering of Asians in America; and most recently, a USDA certified food sovereignty farm growing vegetables by Asian and Black farmers. The AsianWeek Database core team knows the content and the potential of all the news packed into the pages of AsianWeek newspaper. All of the team were born or came to America in the post-1965 era, and we are committed to serving and strengthening the Asian American community. The team is all-volunteer right now, and includes a former AsianWeek Editor & Publisher and experts in social media, marketing, writing, management, advertising and technology. AWDB’s team also brings together the diversity of Asian America. We cross four generations, from Baby Boomers to Gen X’ers to Millennials to Gen Z’s. The sharing of wisdom and youthfulness across ages and backgrounds enriches our content and communications. Ethnicities and mixes represented among members include Vietnamese, South Indian, Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, Asian-Latin, and more. AWDB’s core team works with a wide network of Asian American leaders, pioneers and celebrities to help promote Asian American history, including original writers of AsianWeek. We also have relationships with dozens of community organizations that we develop partnerships with. The technology team that developed the software for the database are experts in Artificial Intelligence and have created a state-of-the art platform for housing all the news articles of AsianWeek in a publicly accessible on-line format. We are the right people to make the AsianWeek Database Project an important resource for helping Asian Amerians be seen, heard, empowered and united.

About the Organization:

The AsianWeek Foundation was founded in 2004 as a legacy project of AsianWeek to do community work. Now, the AsianWeek Foundation makes the articles of AsianWeek the legacy, by creating the AsianWeek Database. The AsianWeek Foundation is an established and certified non-profit 501c3 corporation. It has operated new and powerful initiatives bringing together the diversity of the Asian American community. Past projects include the Hep B Free campaign to end the biggest health disparity for all Asians; the Asian Heritage Street Celebration, the largest annual outdoor gathering of Asians in America; and most recently, a USDA certified food sovereignty farm growing vegetables by Asian and Black farmers. The AsianWeek Database core team knows the content and the potential of all the news packed into the pages of AsianWeek newspaper. All of the team were born or came to America in the post-1965 era, and we are committed to serving and strengthening the Asian American community. The team is all-volunteer right now, and includes a former AsianWeek Editor & Publisher and experts in social media, marketing, writing, management, advertising and technology. AWDB’s team also brings together the diversity of Asian America. We cross four generations, from Baby Boomers to Gen X’ers to Millennials to Gen Z’s. The sharing of wisdom and youthfulness across ages and backgrounds enriches our content and communications. Ethnicities and mixes represented among members include Vietnamese, South Indian, Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, Asian-Latin, and more. AWDB’s core team works with a wide network of Asian American leaders, pioneers and celebrities to help promote Asian American history, including original writers of AsianWeek. We also have relationships with dozens of community organizations that we develop partnerships with. The technology team that developed the software for the database are experts in Artificial Intelligence and have created a state-of-the art platform for housing all the news articles of AsianWeek in a publicly accessible on-line format. We are the right people to make the AsianWeek Database Project an important resource for helping Asian Amerians be seen, heard, empowered and united.

organizational budget

$50,000 - $100,000

existence for

16-20 YEARS

Organization benefits AAPIs residing in the following state(s):

National • Alabama • Alaska • Arizona • Arkansas • California • Colorado • Connecticut • Delaware • District of Columbia • Florida • Georgia • Hawaii • Idaho • Illinois • Indiana • Iowa • Kansas • Kentucky • Louisiana • Maine • Maryland • Massachusetts • Michigan • Minnesota • Mississippi • Missouri • Montana • Nebraska • Nevada • New Hampshire • New Jersey • New Mexico • New York • North Carolina • North Dakota • Ohio • Oklahoma • Oregon • Pennsylvania • Puerto Rico • Rhode Island • South Carolina • South Dakota • Tennessee • Texas • Utah • Vermont • Virginia • Washington • West Virginia • Wisconsin • Wyoming

organizational budget

$50,000 - $100,000

existence for

16-20 YEARS

Organization benefits AAPIs residing in the following state(s):

National • Alabama • Alaska • Arizona • Arkansas • California • Colorado • Connecticut • Delaware • District of Columbia • Florida • Georgia • Hawaii • Idaho • Illinois • Indiana • Iowa • Kansas • Kentucky • Louisiana • Maine • Maryland • Massachusetts • Michigan • Minnesota • Mississippi • Missouri • Montana • Nebraska • Nevada • New Hampshire • New Jersey • New Mexico • New York • North Carolina • North Dakota • Ohio • Oklahoma • Oregon • Pennsylvania • Puerto Rico • Rhode Island • South Carolina • South Dakota • Tennessee • Texas • Utah • Vermont • Virginia • Washington • West Virginia • Wisconsin • Wyoming

The Issue:

Lack of AAPI records affects the development of our community’s identity and the progress of American society. The biggest gaps in the representation of AAPIs in U.S. history are in the telling of: the AAPI movement, our community’s struggle for fairness, and organized activism. This has meant a lack of inclusion or racialization as a perpetual foreigner or model minority. AAPIs should feel a sense of pride, belonging, and community—that we are important contributors to the shaping of American society. We need to honor and preserve our history for future generations to learn from, innovate, and act upon. Beyond the community itself, AAPI history is vital to creating “a more inclusive and accurate history of all the people of America,” as historian Ronald Takaki points out. America does not belong to one race or group. A comprehensive history incorporates the voices of Asian Americans and all people of color.

The Solution:

AWDB seeks to partner with Gold House Future Network and the Reselia technology platform to address the vacancy of AAPI representation in U.S. history and to utilize AWDB’s content of our community’s experiences and perspectives to build a stronger AAPI community and a stronger American future. Our one-year plan entails the following: Complete AWDB’s archival database of post-1965 history as told by AAPI storytellers to preserve the record of AAPI history Promote usage of AWDB content among AAPIs and the general public to develop a sense of pride, belonging, and community Partner with colleges and universities to implement a syllabus of Asian American history utilizing AWDB’s trove of documentation so that future generations can understand our roots as Asian Americans

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