Center for Pan Asian Community Services (CPACS)

Center for Pan Asian Community Services (CPACS)

CPACS was founded in 1980 in Atlanta, Georgia on the belief that people need people. It is the first, largest, and longest standing organization in the Southeast focused on issues concerning Asian Americans. Since its inception CPACS goal has been to deliver a broad continuum of comprehensive, family centered health

Center for Pan Asian Community Services (CPACS)

CPACS was founded in 1980 in Atlanta, Georgia on the belief that people need people. It is the first, largest, and longest standing organization in the Southeast focused on issues concerning Asian Americans. Since its inception CPACS goal has been to deliver a broad continuum of comprehensive, family centered health and social services. CPACS recognizes that health, education, employment, citizenship, and community are interrelated, interdependent, and integral to individual success as well as the ability to contribute to the society in which we live.

About the Organization:

CPACS was founded in 1980 in Atlanta, Georgia on the belief that people need people. It is the first, largest, and longest standing organization in the Southeast focused on issues concerning Asian Americans. Since its inception CPACS goal has been to deliver a broad continuum of comprehensive, family centered health and social services. CPACS recognizes that health, education, employment, citizenship, and community are interrelated, interdependent, and integral to individual success as well as the ability to contribute to the society in which we live.

organizational budget

3 MILLION - 4 MILLION

existence for

31+ YEARS

The Issue:

Cultural diversity is an on-going challenge in meeting community health needs. There are fear and stigma around sensitive topics such as COVID-19, HIV, mental health, and victim services that surround certain racial/ethnic groups. The mistrust and substantial fears among immigrant communities drive people away from accessing basic health services, which can lead to negative health outcomes in the community. Immigrants such as those classified as Asian, Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander (AANHPI) in the southern region are underrepresented and are still held under the model minority myth. Since they are grouped together with other AANHPIs, their disparities are often overlooked. For example, according to the CDC Social Vulnerability Index, the majority of AANHPIs reside in Gwinnett County. Gwinnett is ranked the second populous county in Georgia, in which transportation is limited. Twenty-five percent of Gwinnett County speak another language other than English at home and there is no central method to reach a significant number of residents due to language barrier and cultural unawareness. Due to the lack of communication, residents are not as engaged in community activities. Within the county, a high number of residents are uninsured, there is a limited availability of Medicaid providers, and poor quality of healthcare overall. According to the CDC Quarterly Provisional Death Rates for COVID-19, amongst the highest lie within the “bible belt” states: with Georgia being in the top 10 with the highest quarterly death rate for COVID-19. With our organization in metro Atlanta and in the center of Georgia, all of the neighboring southern states are within a 4-hour drive, which creates a need for our services beyond the state of Georgia. Specific services that provide culturally and linguistically appropriate services for limited English proficient (LEP) immigrant and refugee communities are minimal in the metro Atlanta area. The goals and objectives of this project have been designed to enhance health and social services offered at CPACS and increase our capacity to provide services and access to underserved immigrant and refugee communities not limited to DeKalb and Gwinnett counties, but throughout Georgia.

The Solution:

Jahajee Sisters is a healing and political home for Indo-Caribbeans who have survived or are at risk for experiencing gender-based violence, and we organize with them to achieve gender justice. Our members are immigrant and first-generation survivors, child witnesses, and working class women vulnerable to abuse at home and on the job. Our main programs include the following: Organizing & Advocacy : We meet with our members monthly to organize toward city and state-wide campaign goals and engage in issue-based coalition advocacy focused on immigrant rights, economic justice, and reproductive justice; Community Circles : Our monthly Community Circles are healing & wellness spaces that allow survivors to have a community of support; Annual Summit : The Indo-Caribbean Women’s Empowerment Summit convenes 500 community members and partners for a weekend of dialogue about gender justice; Bi-annual Leadership & Empowerment Institute: This program moves participants through a guided personal change and healing process while supporting them to build their intersectional gender justice analysis and skills for organizing our community; Emergency Fund : We provide micro grants to survivors who are fleeing gender based violence in order to cover critical costs like travel, childcare, rent, and legal support; Case Management : We assess the needs of survivors of gender-based violence in our community, provide emotional support, and connect them to a range of direct services; and Arts & Activism Residency: We house an Indo-Caribbean community artist and support their development of socially conscious art/creative projects that address gender-based violence in order to build awareness about the issue and inspire our community to take action. Additionally, we are completing a needs assessment survey of 200 women and gender-expansive Indo-Caribbeans in order to identify top priorities. Informed by survey results, we will hold a Community Safety Roundtable with partners in early 2023 to dialogue about what government actions can prevent gender-based violence and keep us safe in community-driven ways that do not perpetuate state violence and incarceration. Based on analysis of our survey data and ideas generated at the Roundtable, we will develop a Gender Justice Policy Agenda that we advocate for in partnership with other organizations and impacted communities.

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