Center for the Pacific-Asian Family, Inc.

Center for the Pacific-Asian Family, Inc.

Center for the Pacific Asian Family (CPAF) was founded 1978 to help address domestic violence and sexual assault in the Asian, Asian American, and Pacific Islander (AAPI) communities. CPAF’s mission is to build healthy and safe communities by addressing the root causes and consequences of family violence and violence against

Center for the Pacific-Asian Family, Inc.

Center for the Pacific Asian Family (CPAF) was founded 1978 to help address domestic violence and sexual assault in the Asian, Asian American, and Pacific Islander (AAPI) communities. CPAF’s mission is to build healthy and safe communities by addressing the root causes and consequences of family violence and violence against women. We are committed to meeting the specific cultural and language needs of AAPI women and their families. CPAF’s vision is of an AAPI community that embraces healthy relationships and works in partnership with other communities to eradicate all forms of violence. CPAF is committed to the values of commitment to nonviolence, upholding confidentiality, self-determination, teamwork, continued development, and collaboration. CPAF began when Nilda Rimonte, a Filipina American woman, questioned whether an immigrant AAPI woman experiencing domestic or sexual violence could get help. Finding no clear options available, she pioneered the first U.S. multilingual 24-hour hotline serving AAPI survivors. In 1981, CPAF opened the first multi-lingual/multi-cultural emergency shelter in the nation that specialized in serving AAPI survivors. CPAF was also the first to open a multi-lingual/multi-cultural transitional housing program for survivors who seek to establish independent, violence-free lives. In 2005, CPAF expanded its Community Program, focused on community engagement and violence prevention programs. CPAF provides a wide range of comprehensive services, free of charge, in up to 30 AAPI languages. CPAF remains the only agency in Southern California providing comprehensive domestic violence services (including emergency shelter), and the only rape crisis center in the entire state, focused on AAPI survivors.

About the Organization:

Center for the Pacific Asian Family (CPAF) was founded 1978 to help address domestic violence and sexual assault in the Asian, Asian American, and Pacific Islander (AAPI) communities. CPAF’s mission is to build healthy and safe communities by addressing the root causes and consequences of family violence and violence against women. We are committed to meeting the specific cultural and language needs of AAPI women and their families. CPAF’s vision is of an AAPI community that embraces healthy relationships and works in partnership with other communities to eradicate all forms of violence. CPAF is committed to the values of commitment to nonviolence, upholding confidentiality, self-determination, teamwork, continued development, and collaboration. CPAF began when Nilda Rimonte, a Filipina American woman, questioned whether an immigrant AAPI woman experiencing domestic or sexual violence could get help. Finding no clear options available, she pioneered the first U.S. multilingual 24-hour hotline serving AAPI survivors. In 1981, CPAF opened the first multi-lingual/multi-cultural emergency shelter in the nation that specialized in serving AAPI survivors. CPAF was also the first to open a multi-lingual/multi-cultural transitional housing program for survivors who seek to establish independent, violence-free lives. In 2005, CPAF expanded its Community Program, focused on community engagement and violence prevention programs. CPAF provides a wide range of comprehensive services, free of charge, in up to 30 AAPI languages. CPAF remains the only agency in Southern California providing comprehensive domestic violence services (including emergency shelter), and the only rape crisis center in the entire state, focused on AAPI survivors.

organizational budget

5 MILLION - 8 MILLION

existence for

31+ YEARS

Organization benefits AAPIs residing in the following state(s):

California

organizational budget

5 MILLION - 8 MILLION

existence for

31+ YEARS

Organization benefits AAPIs residing in the following state(s):

California

The Issue:

The AAPI population of Los Angeles (L.A.) County, CA (1.5 million = 15% of population) is larger than it is in all but three states, with over 45 distinct ethnic groups speaking 28 languages. 65% of AAPIs in the county are immigrants; 34% are limited English proficient. AAPI youth in L.A. County face numerous barriers to building safe communities and a future protected from violence , including dating violence, domestic, violence, and sexual assault. Research (https://doi.org/10.1177/0886260513496895) indicates that youth experience of dating violence has long-term effects on survivors’ educational attainment and lifetime earnings. This diminished economic potential could leave these survivors vulnerable to further abuse. A similar study (https://www.valor.us/publications/the-cost-consequences-of-sexual-violence-in-california/) summarized the economic costs of sexual violence in California, with 64% of the cost resulting from the sexual assault of minors. However, preventing these forms of violence requires proactive conversations about sexuality and intimate relationships, but these are often taboo topics within AAPI families. A recent study of L.A. County AAPI youth confirmed they are uncomfortable speaking to their parents about intimate relationships and are more likely to turn to their peers or adult allies for information or help. However, other AAPI youth and adults report feeling ill-equipped to address these forms of violence . Furthermore, when intimate relationships start to become unhealthy, the cultural stigma around avoiding shame (“losing face”) can further inhibit the open discussions which help prevent harm from relationship violence. Moreover, the past few years have witnessed sustained anti-immigrant rhetoric and polices, coupled with dramatically escalating anti-AAPI hate – with more than 5.5 times the number of anti-Asian hate incidents in California in 2021 compared to 2019. This sociopolitical climate makes public engagement an increasingly unsafe endeavor for AAPI immigrant communities, further inhibiting the work to prevent and end violence. In fact, while making up 12% of the population in the City of Los Angeles where CPAF is located, AAPI survivors make up less than 2% of the domestic violence and less than 3% of the sexual assault reported to the L.A. Police Department. The issues of domestic/sexual violence in AAPI communities thus remain shadowed in stigma and silence.

The Solution:

In pursuit of CPAF’s vision of an AAPI community that works toward eradicating all forms of violence, CPAF recognizes that youth have the strategic capacity to shape a violence-free future . Youth voices/actions can and do reshape community norms and narratives and modify the systems and policies affecting their communities. CPAF therefore desires to promote youth-driven, community-rooted change toward resilience and nonviolence. CPAF's “Rooted Leadership” Youth Program trains AAPI youth to become peer advocates and change agents in their communities to prevent relationship violence. This program creates a pathway for AAPI youth to understand, embrace, and celebrate their cultural identities and to pursue growth in the context of those identities – toward personal well-being (including social-emotional learning and mental health), toward healthy relationships free of violence, and toward roles of influence among their peers and in their communities. CPAF’s “Rooted Leadership” Youth program equips AAPI youth to lead courageous conversations in their communities. In solidarity with other BIPOC youth, the program equips them for grassroots-level action for social change toward preventing violence. The program includes the following activities: A) Educate youth on issues of healthy relationships, relationship violence, and peer counseling/advocacy . CPAF provides weekly educational workshops to youth during the school year through partnerships with local high schools and community partner organizations. B) Engage youth as key change agents to break the silence through a youth leadership development process called “Rooted Leadership Project.” Youth advocates aged 13-18 spend 3-6 months to learn about root causes of violence in their communities. Youth conduct community assessments and develop proposals to identify strategies for ending violence in their communities with the support of adult mentors. C) Support youth to progressively take greater engagement responsibility within their communities . Youth leadership team members will create and organize 2 major awareness campaigns to reach over 1,500 youth. D) Host an Annual Youth Forum, co-organized by youth and adult allies . The Forum provides a space for youth to share ideas and resources to prevent relationship violence and promote healthy relationships and communities by exploring various tools and techniques used to engage youth in the practice of social change.

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