Densho

Densho

Densho is a Japanese term meaning “to pass on to the next generation,” or to leave a legacy. Densho is an online archive and public history organization that documents the stories of Japanese Americans incarcerated during World War II. Our public website offers irreplaceable firsthand accounts, historical materials, and educational

Densho

Densho is a Japanese term meaning “to pass on to the next generation,” or to leave a legacy. Densho is an online archive and public history organization that documents the stories of Japanese Americans incarcerated during World War II. Our public website offers irreplaceable firsthand accounts, historical materials, and educational resources. Founded in 1996, Densho is a trailblazer in the use of digital technology to preserve and share historical materials. Linking the past to the present, Densho creates awareness of racial and ethnic scapegoating and works to solve this and related problems.

About the Organization:

Densho is a Japanese term meaning “to pass on to the next generation,” or to leave a legacy. Densho is an online archive and public history organization that documents the stories of Japanese Americans incarcerated during World War II. Our public website offers irreplaceable firsthand accounts, historical materials, and educational resources. Founded in 1996, Densho is a trailblazer in the use of digital technology to preserve and share historical materials. Linking the past to the present, Densho creates awareness of racial and ethnic scapegoating and works to solve this and related problems.

organizational budget

$1 MILLION - $2 MILLION

existence for

21-25 YEARS

The Issue:

Xenophobia and scapegoating targeting AAPI communities are on the rise again in America, reviving a long and ugly history of violence, as well as violations of civil liberties, and human and constitutional rights. To be able to stop AAPI hate crimes and violations of rights against AAPI communities, Americans need to be educated and made aware of the historical and pervasive nature of this problem.
Much of the research, knowledge, and lessons learned from historical AAPI xenophobia and scapegoating are found with scholars in academic institutions, which is often removed from the challenges faced by AAPI activists fighting against xenophobia and scapegoating on the streets today. In particular, the scholarship and lessons learned from the WWII Japanese American incarceration are helpful in examining the trajectory and responses with similar injustices today.

The Solution:

The proposed project is a symposium, tentatively titled, “80 Years After, Connecting the Japanese American WWII Incarceration with Injustices Today.” The symposium will feature scholars of Japanese American history who are actively researching and writing new materials. Their work illuminates our understanding of one of our country’s largest violations of civil liberties, which happened to an AAPI community. Featured with the scholars will be AAPI activists who are addressing current issues like anti-Asian hatred, reparations for slavery, Muslim travel restrictions, and immigrant family detention and separation. The symposium will connect the research, ideas, and scholars at academic institutions with the issues, challenges, and activists at the community grassroots level.
The three-day symposium will include:
  • Public presentations by scholars and activists;
  • Group discussions between scholars and community activists; and
  • Separate scholars’ and activists’ roundtable discussions.
The public presentations will be in-person, live streamed and recorded for viewing after the event.

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