Empowering Pilipino Youth through Collaboration (EPYC)

Empowering Pilipino Youth through Collaboration (EPYC)

We primarily measure our success by our alumni engagement from Ambassadors who become coaches to mentor the next cohort of EPYC Ambassadors, to alumni serving as speakers on panels and workshops for the program, to our network that refers new members to join EPYC. From what started as a 12

Empowering Pilipino Youth through Collaboration (EPYC)

We primarily measure our success by our alumni engagement from Ambassadors who become coaches to mentor the next cohort of EPYC Ambassadors, to alumni serving as speakers on panels and workshops for the program, to our network that refers new members to join EPYC. From what started as a 12 inaugural Ambassadors class has grown into a 142 person “EPYC Alumni” Facebook group where new and old members are added to stay connected to the EPYC family. In one transition year, a selected committee of four composed of a previous EPYC Ambassador, Coaches, and an external consultant assessed the program by Google form surveys disbursed to all EPYC alumni. With over 50% responses, our team analyzed the quantitative and qualitative data and presented high-level findings to the NaFFAA Board of Governors as a new program design. For example, participants wanted more structure for their program engagement. We implemented a new structured curriculum including writing problem statements, interviewing stakeholders, and creating rapid prototypes that supported Ambassadors to problem-solve an issue in their community with recommendations they presented as a capstone to their peers and the EPYC leadership team. From the program’s start, we constantly encourage our young leaders to share their feedback and insight about their experiences because we want to value and model growth as an organization. Our Ambassadors, Coaches, and even Staff have the opportunity to set up individual meetings with the Program Director and any member of the EPYC leadership team to discuss feedback throughout the program. We take all the feedback and do our best to implement new ideas into the next year’s curriculum for a better EPYC experience. The feedback has consistently been that our participants enjoy getting to know fellow Fil-Ams from across the country because they gain a sense of community outside of their own local communities. As a result, our participants stay: One 2021 Ambassador from New York became involved with the NaFFAA New York region as a youth rep. One 2020 Ambassador joined our EPYC leadership. Our people are our biggest measure for success, but also our greatest drivers for growth.

About the Organization:

We primarily measure our success by our alumni engagement from Ambassadors who become coaches to mentor the next cohort of EPYC Ambassadors, to alumni serving as speakers on panels and workshops for the program, to our network that refers new members to join EPYC. From what started as a 12 inaugural Ambassadors class has grown into a 142 person “EPYC Alumni” Facebook group where new and old members are added to stay connected to the EPYC family. In one transition year, a selected committee of four composed of a previous EPYC Ambassador, Coaches, and an external consultant assessed the program by Google form surveys disbursed to all EPYC alumni. With over 50% responses, our team analyzed the quantitative and qualitative data and presented high-level findings to the NaFFAA Board of Governors as a new program design. For example, participants wanted more structure for their program engagement. We implemented a new structured curriculum including writing problem statements, interviewing stakeholders, and creating rapid prototypes that supported Ambassadors to problem-solve an issue in their community with recommendations they presented as a capstone to their peers and the EPYC leadership team. From the program’s start, we constantly encourage our young leaders to share their feedback and insight about their experiences because we want to value and model growth as an organization. Our Ambassadors, Coaches, and even Staff have the opportunity to set up individual meetings with the Program Director and any member of the EPYC leadership team to discuss feedback throughout the program. We take all the feedback and do our best to implement new ideas into the next year’s curriculum for a better EPYC experience. The feedback has consistently been that our participants enjoy getting to know fellow Fil-Ams from across the country because they gain a sense of community outside of their own local communities. As a result, our participants stay: One 2021 Ambassador from New York became involved with the NaFFAA New York region as a youth rep. One 2020 Ambassador joined our EPYC leadership. Our people are our biggest measure for success, but also our greatest drivers for growth.

organizational budget

$0 - $50,000

existence for

6-10 YEARS

Organization benefits AAPIs residing in the following state(s):

National • Alabama • Alaska • Arizona • Arkansas • California • Colorado • Connecticut • Delaware • District of Columbia • Florida • Georgia • Hawaii • Idaho • Illinois • Indiana • Iowa • Kansas • Kentucky • Louisiana • Maine • Maryland • Massachusetts • Michigan • Minnesota • Mississippi • Missouri • Montana • Nebraska • Nevada • New Hampshire • New Jersey • New Mexico • New York • North Carolina • North Dakota • Ohio • Oklahoma • Oregon • Pennsylvania • Puerto Rico • Rhode Island • South Carolina • South Dakota • Tennessee • Texas • Utah • Vermont • Virginia • Washington • West Virginia • Wisconsin • Wyoming

organizational budget

$0 - $50,000

existence for

6-10 YEARS

Organization benefits AAPIs residing in the following state(s):

National • Alabama • Alaska • Arizona • Arkansas • California • Colorado • Connecticut • Delaware • District of Columbia • Florida • Georgia • Hawaii • Idaho • Illinois • Indiana • Iowa • Kansas • Kentucky • Louisiana • Maine • Maryland • Massachusetts • Michigan • Minnesota • Mississippi • Missouri • Montana • Nebraska • Nevada • New Hampshire • New Jersey • New Mexico • New York • North Carolina • North Dakota • Ohio • Oklahoma • Oregon • Pennsylvania • Puerto Rico • Rhode Island • South Carolina • South Dakota • Tennessee • Texas • Utah • Vermont • Virginia • Washington • West Virginia • Wisconsin • Wyoming

The Issue:

According to the U.S. Census, of the four million Filipinos living in the U.S., one-fourth (almost one million) are youth between the ages of 18 to 34. After conducting focus groups, NaFFAA found that Filipino youth interviewed lack the resources and skills needed for campus and non-profit leadership positions; face difficulty juggling personal, extracurricular, and academic priorities; and fail to continue remaining engaged after graduation due to burnout, lack of mentorship, or professional and familial responsibilities.

The Solution:

To address these issues, in the summer of 2017, NaFFAA launched its inaugural Empowering Pilipino Youth through Collaboration (EPYC) Ambassadors Program to strengthen the personal and professional development of young Filipino-Americans. The Program aims to equip young leaders to refine their skills and learn new strategies in order to become stronger advocates and deliver more effective programs and services. Ambassadors, who are around 18 to 25 years old will support NaFFAA’s efforts around leadership development, civic engagement, and national advocacy and help scale and build programs within their campuses and communities. They also gain vital knowledge and skills around professional development, networking, Filipino American history, coalition building, and other key areas. Since its founding, the Ambassadors have engaged fellow young Filipino Americans across the country by hosting events and participating in conferences, writing blogs and leveraging social media, and leading a capstone initiative called “My EPYC Project” focused around leadership development, civic engagement, or advocacy. They also attend monthly webinars to help develop their knowledge, attitudes, and skills in key areas. These experiences not only further enhance their abilities as community organizers, but also push them to grow in the domains of personal and professional leadership. The curriculum they undergo is grounded in the principles of human-centered design and application-based learning, allowing participants the opportunity to experience what it looks and feels like to lead with equity. Ultimately, the goal is to be the ideal reflection of the Filipino American community today — engaging, nurturing, and empowering — while growing the future leaders of the community and of the nation.

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