Faith & Community Empowerment

Faith & Community Empowerment

Over the years, FACE has made significant contributions towards the advocacy of both Asian Americans, and underserved minorities, especially in the LA Area. We have championed Black/Asian Solidarity – as the surge in anti-Asian hate crimes continues to rise, FACE has worked to bring solidarity between the Black and AAPI community

Faith & Community Empowerment

Over the years, FACE has made significant contributions towards the advocacy of both Asian Americans, and underserved minorities, especially in the LA Area. We have championed Black/Asian Solidarity – as the surge in anti-Asian hate crimes continues to rise, FACE has worked to bring solidarity between the Black and AAPI community through several intimate meetings between Black and Asian clergy as well as seminars and AAPI Town Halls to discuss Model Minority Myth that has historically been used as a barrier between the two groups as well as shed light on the oppression and needs of the AAPI community. Last year, FACE CEO Hyepin Im and Rev. Mark Whitlock of the AME church wrote an Asian Lives Matter Op-Ed discussing the difficult but powerful journey to solidarity. Our current advocacy efforts for inclusion of AAPI in equity initiatives led to a PNC $88 billion community benefits agreement that included the AAPI community, potentially partnering with well known banks such as Chase, as well as co-chairing housing equity working group for National Housing Conference. In addition to this, our efforts locally have been recognized, as this past year’s SAIGU campaign commemorating the 30th anniversary of the LA Riots, resulted in a miraculous and historic healing between the Latasha Harlins family and the Korean community which landed on the front page of the LA Times. Subsequently, FACE was awarded a Congressional Record by Congressman Andy Kim & House of Representatives for Efforts to Unite LA in Commemorating 1992 LA Riots. Not only this, but our efforts have also made it as far as the White House, as our President & CEO Hyepin Im was able to visit the capitol and share space with President Biden to both celebrate and commemorate AAPI Heritage Month.

About the Organization:

Over the years, FACE has made significant contributions towards the advocacy of both Asian Americans, and underserved minorities, especially in the LA Area. We have championed Black/Asian Solidarity – as the surge in anti-Asian hate crimes continues to rise, FACE has worked to bring solidarity between the Black and AAPI community through several intimate meetings between Black and Asian clergy as well as seminars and AAPI Town Halls to discuss Model Minority Myth that has historically been used as a barrier between the two groups as well as shed light on the oppression and needs of the AAPI community. Last year, FACE CEO Hyepin Im and Rev. Mark Whitlock of the AME church wrote an Asian Lives Matter Op-Ed discussing the difficult but powerful journey to solidarity. Our current advocacy efforts for inclusion of AAPI in equity initiatives led to a PNC $88 billion community benefits agreement that included the AAPI community, potentially partnering with well known banks such as Chase, as well as co-chairing housing equity working group for National Housing Conference. In addition to this, our efforts locally have been recognized, as this past year’s SAIGU campaign commemorating the 30th anniversary of the LA Riots, resulted in a miraculous and historic healing between the Latasha Harlins family and the Korean community which landed on the front page of the LA Times. Subsequently, FACE was awarded a Congressional Record by Congressman Andy Kim & House of Representatives for Efforts to Unite LA in Commemorating 1992 LA Riots. Not only this, but our efforts have also made it as far as the White House, as our President & CEO Hyepin Im was able to visit the capitol and share space with President Biden to both celebrate and commemorate AAPI Heritage Month.

organizational budget

$500,000 - $1 MILLION

existence for

21-25 YEARS

The Issue:

The model minority myth, the aggregations of data of over 50 groups under the AAPI umbrella, and the lack of representation in government offices and C-suites of corporate America has resulted in the dissemination of a false narrative that the AAPI community is white adjacent and do not experience any of the historic racism that other communities of color face. The lack of awareness of the reality of AAPI communities not only by other policymakers and other decision makers but also by our own communities has resulted in continued erasure and lack of inclusion of AAPI communities in important decision making rooms as well as opportunities that lead to outreach, funding, programs, promotion, influence, solidarity and welcome in this country. It has also led to being pitted against other minority groups resulting in resentment, hate and violence. With over 50 countries under the umbrella of AAPI label, the aggregation of AAPI data does quite a disservice to many of the subgroups. As an example, the 2019 national homeownership data shows that AAPI homeownership rate is 61% which is close to white homeownership rate of 66%. In contrast, Hispanic rate is 48% and Black rate is 42%. Looking at these data points, policymakers and community advocates have announced numerous multi-billion dollar equity initiatives and homeownership initiatives to lift black and brown homeownership while excluding the AAPI community. It is only when you disaggregate the AAPI data, that you see that there are 8 AAPI subgroups equal or below the Black homeownership rates and 12 AAPI subgroups below the Hispanic homeownership rates. Without such information, the AAPI community continues to be left behind in these types of investments and opportunities. In addition, the AAPI community has lacked mentorship and training for leadership roles and opportunities. Despite AAPIs having the highest educational attainment rate, they also have the lowest likelihood of being promoted to management in the workplace. The lack of programs to foster a pipeline of AAPI leaders in government, education, business and other areas keep the AAPI community has perpetual foreigners that become easy targets of discrimination and violence.

The Solution:

Through Our Black Asian Solidarity efforts and our SAIGU: LA Riots 30 th Anniversary Campaign, we have produced many powerpoints that demonstrate that the AAPI community suffers from the same economic and social challenges of communities of color. Through numerous speaking engagements and events we have partnered with, we have raised awareness of the same discrimination of AAPIs suffer in housing, criminal justice system, covid death rates, discrimination in work place, mental health, unemployment, business closures and so many other areas. This has led to Black and Brown community leaders to open their eyes and create solidarity and join forces on many fronts. It has also led to corporate and government leaders to include AAPIs in their policies and funding. FACE has been a strong advocate and bringing our API and faith voice for those who are underserved and voiceless on many multiple issues locally and nationally. Some of the areas where FACE is engaging include housing, homeownership, immigration reform, peace on Korean peninsula, a balanced ethnic curriculum, amongst others. FACE has also hosted many convening with governmental/corporate decision makers and stakeholders in the faith community as well as the API community. Some past convenings have included with SBA, Metro CEO, LAPD, LAHSA, various elected officials, White House, SAMHSA, HUD, US. Department of LABOR Secretary, amongst others. Also through our C2 Leadership Institute, we have trained many faith and community leaders to engage in community development and form partnerships with the broader community. Such partnerships have lead to mutuality and greater funding. Our AAPI Youth@Work Career Pathways Initiative and the Mentorship Speaker Series Program helps to create a pipeline of AAPI leaders. The LA County AAPI population make up 15% of the county population, yet only 3% of the Youth@Work paid internship programs are AAPI students. Youth@Work prepares underserved youth ages 14-24 who live in LA County for jobs and careers. The 120-hour internship provides students job training opportunities depending on their interest with one of 40 different departments in Los Angeles County or with private and nonprofit companies. After two years of advocacy, we won 3000 internship for AAPI youth.

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