Family Promise of Hawaii

Family Promise of Hawaii

Family Promise of Hawaii (FPH) works to prevent and end homelessness for families with children. Its mission is to help homeless and low-income families achieve sustainable independence by mobilizing existing community resources and support, and its vision is an Oahu where vulnerable families have equitable access to housing. Woven across

Family Promise of Hawaii

Family Promise of Hawaii (FPH) works to prevent and end homelessness for families with children. Its mission is to help homeless and low-income families achieve sustainable independence by mobilizing existing community resources and support, and its vision is an Oahu where vulnerable families have equitable access to housing. Woven across the organization are its core values: Dignity and Worth of All Persons, Hospitality, Housing-Focused, Low Barriers, Collaboration, Trauma-Informed, and Anti-Racist. FPH works to see, hear, empower, and unite AAPI families and communities to ultimately end family homelessness, because housing is among the most foundational resources for one’s well-being, and housing instability in childhood can have long-lasting impacts. All of FPH’s efforts are dedicated to helping families quickly exit homelessness and sustainably attain stable housing. FPH provides unique, innovative, and compassionate programs that empower AAPI families and unite communities, including an emergency shelter program that provides separate rooms for each family, rental subsidies to prevent evictions and quickly re-house the most vulnerable families, and a drop-in Day Center with access to food, showers, computers, and other necessities. Families in each program receive individualized, culturally competent case management to help them navigate their challenges, including housing search support, job skills training, and financial coaching. Last year, FPH served 297 families (866 individuals). Since its founding 17 years ago, FPH has enabled over 6,000 children, parents, and family members to secure stable housing, economic security, and a brighter future.

About the Organization:

Family Promise of Hawaii (FPH) works to prevent and end homelessness for families with children. Its mission is to help homeless and low-income families achieve sustainable independence by mobilizing existing community resources and support, and its vision is an Oahu where vulnerable families have equitable access to housing. Woven across the organization are its core values: Dignity and Worth of All Persons, Hospitality, Housing-Focused, Low Barriers, Collaboration, Trauma-Informed, and Anti-Racist. FPH works to see, hear, empower, and unite AAPI families and communities to ultimately end family homelessness, because housing is among the most foundational resources for one’s well-being, and housing instability in childhood can have long-lasting impacts. All of FPH’s efforts are dedicated to helping families quickly exit homelessness and sustainably attain stable housing. FPH provides unique, innovative, and compassionate programs that empower AAPI families and unite communities, including an emergency shelter program that provides separate rooms for each family, rental subsidies to prevent evictions and quickly re-house the most vulnerable families, and a drop-in Day Center with access to food, showers, computers, and other necessities. Families in each program receive individualized, culturally competent case management to help them navigate their challenges, including housing search support, job skills training, and financial coaching. Last year, FPH served 297 families (866 individuals). Since its founding 17 years ago, FPH has enabled over 6,000 children, parents, and family members to secure stable housing, economic security, and a brighter future.

organizational budget

$1 MILLION - $2 MILLION

existence for

16-20 YEARS

Organization benefits AAPIs residing in the following state(s):

California

organizational budget

$1 MILLION - $2 MILLION

existence for

16-20 YEARS

Organization benefits AAPIs residing in the following state(s):

California

The Issue:

FPH addresses one of the most urgent social challenges in Hawaii: family homelessness. Families with children experiencing homelessness are often called the “hidden homeless” and receive far less attention and support than other forms of homelessness. Yet federal research shows that children under age 5 are more likely to experience homelessness than people of any other age, and in Hawaii, 1 in 30 young children experience homelessness. On a single day earlier this year, 236 families (947 individuals) on Oahu were experiencing homelessness, according to the Point in Time Count report. Because children’s brains are developing so rapidly in their first few years, their early experiences can have lifelong effects. Research shows that homelessness negatively impacts children’s health, development, education, and other well-being indicators. This is why ending family homelessness is such an urgent challenge — with major implications for the entire community. The majority of FPH’s clients belong to the Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander communities, reflecting deep inequities stemming from the illegal overthrow of the sovereign Hawaiian government just 130 years ago. Native Hawaiians were dispossessed of their lands and continue to face the gravest disparities today. A staggering 49% of Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders struggle to make enough money to meet their basic needs, according to a recent Aloha United Way report. The Point in Time Count also found that Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islanders on Oahu account for 35% of the total homeless population, while only representing 10% of the island's total population. Over the past five years, the cost of living has continued to increase, exacerbated by the pandemic, which hit Hawaii’s tourism-dependent economy harder than most other states. These increasing disparities disproportionately affect Hawaii’s AAPI population, and this economic insecurity puts them at higher risk of homelessness. Among AAPI children in Hawaii, 13,000 (12%) are living in poverty, 39,000 (34%) live in households with a high housing cost burden, 41,000 (36%) have parents that lack secure employment, and 43,000 (37%) are part of families that receive public assistance benefits, according to the Kids Count Data Center.

The Solution:

FPH is the only organization exclusively dedicated to addressing family homelessness on Oahu. Its programs provide much-needed services empowering families to quickly return to permanent housing and achieve sustainable independence: Emergency Shelter: FPH has space for up to 12 families (48 individuals) to stay while working to get back into permanent housing. Unlike traditional “congregate” shelters, FPH’s program provides each family with a separate room — a more empowering model that gives families more trust and autonomy and creates a more collaborative relationship with FPH staff and volunteers. Families are provided with personal hygiene items, food, transportation, and comprehensive case management at no cost. Rental Assistance: FPH provides rental assistance and case management to rapidly move families from homelessness to housing. Stabilization: FPH created the WAʻA (Working, Attaining, Achieving) framework, modeled after the Hawaiian outrigger canoe (waʻa). WA’A positions families as the leader of the waʻa, empowering them to chart their own course to housing and economic stability, supported by a crew of FPH staff members. This framework underlies FPH’s services to help families reach long-term stability, including: workforce development training to gain in-demand skills, financial literacy education, and a $250 savings match program. Day Center: This drop-in facility provides access to food, showers, washers and dryers, computers, and other necessities. FPH is in the early stages of developing the ʻOhana Navigation Center, a first-of-its-kind campus on Oahu where families experiencing homelessness can attain a home, a livelihood, and a brighter future. This child-friendly campus will contain all of the resources that families need, drawing on FPH’s 17 years of experience and community input to ensure that services are trauma-informed, culturally responsive, and community-driven, based on the traditional Hawaiian kauhale. The facility will offer short-term non-congregate shelter, providing each family with a separate room. The facility will also include on-site case management, a community kitchen, a children’s play area, computers, and a room for group activities such as community meals, health screenings, financial and employment workshops, and tutoring. Most importantly, FPH envisions this Center as a replicable model to provide these crucial services in other parts of the state.

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