Hawai’i LGBT Legacy Foundation

Hawai’i LGBT Legacy Foundation

Perhaps best known as the organization that produces the annual combined Honolulu Pride Parade & Festival, the Hawaiʻi LGBT Legacy Foundation was founded in 2008 with the mission to support, empower, educate, unify, & facilitate LGBT organizations & individuals in Hawaiʻi. Our projects engage the full spectrum of the LGBTQIA+

Hawai’i LGBT Legacy Foundation

Perhaps best known as the organization that produces the annual combined Honolulu Pride Parade & Festival, the Hawaiʻi LGBT Legacy Foundation was founded in 2008 with the mission to support, empower, educate, unify, & facilitate LGBT organizations & individuals in Hawaiʻi. Our projects engage the full spectrum of the LGBTQIA+ community: across all age groups, gender identities & cultural backgrounds. With an all-volunteer board of directors and one employed staff member, the foundation conducts equity and inclusion trainings, offers community forums to engage in thoughtful discussions, and organizes public events that seek to support uplift the queer community, especially for youth, trans people, and the Indigenous people of the Pacific.

About the Organization:

Perhaps best known as the organization that produces the annual combined Honolulu Pride Parade & Festival, the Hawaiʻi LGBT Legacy Foundation was founded in 2008 with the mission to support, empower, educate, unify, & facilitate LGBT organizations & individuals in Hawaiʻi. Our projects engage the full spectrum of the LGBTQIA+ community: across all age groups, gender identities & cultural backgrounds. With an all-volunteer board of directors and one employed staff member, the foundation conducts equity and inclusion trainings, offers community forums to engage in thoughtful discussions, and organizes public events that seek to support uplift the queer community, especially for youth, trans people, and the Indigenous people of the Pacific.

organizational budget

$100,000 - $500,000

existence for

11-15 YEARS

Organization benefits AAPIs residing in the following state(s):

National • Alabama • Alaska • Arizona • Arkansas • California • Colorado • Connecticut • Delaware • District of Columbia • Florida • Georgia • Hawaii • Idaho • Illinois • Indiana • Iowa • Kansas • Kentucky • Louisiana • Maine • Maryland • Massachusetts • Michigan • Minnesota • Mississippi • Missouri • Montana • Nebraska • Nevada • New Hampshire • New Jersey • New Mexico • New York • North Carolina • North Dakota • Ohio • Oklahoma • Oregon • Pennsylvania • Rhode Island • South Carolina • South Dakota • Tennessee • Texas • Utah • Vermont • Virginia • Washington • West Virginia • Wisconsin • Wyoming • Puerto Rico

organizational budget

$100,000 - $500,000

existence for

11-15 YEARS

Organization benefits AAPIs residing in the following state(s):

National • Alabama • Alaska • Arizona • Arkansas • California • Colorado • Connecticut • Delaware • District of Columbia • Florida • Georgia • Hawaii • Idaho • Illinois • Indiana • Iowa • Kansas • Kentucky • Louisiana • Maine • Maryland • Massachusetts • Michigan • Minnesota • Mississippi • Missouri • Montana • Nebraska • Nevada • New Hampshire • New Jersey • New Mexico • New York • North Carolina • North Dakota • Ohio • Oklahoma • Oregon • Pennsylvania • Rhode Island • South Carolina • South Dakota • Tennessee • Texas • Utah • Vermont • Virginia • Washington • West Virginia • Wisconsin • Wyoming • Puerto Rico

The Issue:

Despite the decades of work from queer activists, scholars, and community organizers, transphobia and homophobia continues to be embedded in the laws and policies of different jurisdictions across the United States. There are two groups that the Hawai'i LGBT Legacy Foundation is seeking to focus on: 1) For LGBTQ+ youth specifically, in addition to political and institutional barriers, they also face harrowing health disparities. According to the 2018 Hawai'i Sexual and Gender Minority Report conducted by the Hawai'i State Department of Health, trans youth are seven times more likely to commit suicide than cisgender youth. In a similar vein, gay, lesbian, and bisexual youth are four times more likely to commit suicide than their heterosexual counterparts. 2) And for Indigenous people, especially Kanaka Maoli (Native Hawaiian) and other Pacific Islanders, homophobia and transphobia is part and parcel of the machine that is colonization. For those Indigenous folks who identify beyond the binary or whose love is more expansive than just the "opposite sex," to be queer/two-spirited/mahu cannot be separated from what it means to be Indigenous.

The Solution:

Our solution at its core is community based and community driven. As a volunteer board of directors with one staff member -- the executive director -- our mission is to empower others by providing resources, guidance, and support. That comes in the form of various programs and events Including: Na Pohaku Ola Kapaemahu/Rainbow Town Halls - In order to ground the work we do culturally, we open Honolulu Pride Month with a ceremony at the stones located at Waikiki Beach, to honor and pay tribute to ancestors, culture, and Pasefika peoples. Additionally, the Hawai'i LGBT Legacy Foundation organizes a series of Rainbow Town Halls throughout the year exploring relevant topics including exploring what it means to be a queer kūpuna (elder) and opportunities to meet candidates running for office, Pride Pa'ina La Ohana - This inaugural event offered a free and safe space for queer youth and families to come together to ensure that pride celebrations are not relegated to just one month of the year. The event provided musical guests, dance performances, cheerleading, free information to health and nonprofit services offered island wide, food, and cultural arts and crafts. The event culminated with the first ever Youth Drag Show Case in which we paired a youth with a local drag queen to prepare a number. Honolulu Pride - The annual pride parade and festival occurs in October. With more than 4,500 parade participants and 8,000 attendees to the festival, it is completely free and open to the public. Last year was the first year that the pride parade was led by Indigenous folks, to pay homage and tribute to the people and lands we occupy. Social Media/Photo Campaigns - We've engaged in various audio and visual campaigns that spotlight real people and their own personal stories, including their coming out experiences and even their relationship with their family, both chosen and biological. For example, in honor of Mother's Day, we engaged in a series called MĀKUAHINE, which explores maternal love in its many amazing and diverse forms.

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