KALO HCC

KALO HCC

KALO HCC is the right community to do this work because community and aloha is our foundation. Hawaiians, and all Pacific Islanders, understood the concept of community. Our people were voyagers and spent months at sea with no navigation tools but the stars. We are believers that nature is the

KALO HCC

KALO HCC is the right community to do this work because community and aloha is our foundation. Hawaiians, and all Pacific Islanders, understood the concept of community. Our people were voyagers and spent months at sea with no navigation tools but the stars. We are believers that nature is the true guide and when we listen the earth provides. We are the right people because who better to uplift and support the Pacific Islanders. Our impact can be measured by the relationships and collaborations we have built over the short three years we have been in existence. Although our mother organization, the Association of Hawaiian Civic Club, was founded over 100 years ago by Prince Jonah Kuhio Kalaniʻanaʻole, we are still young and have so much to learn. Many may wonder if we are able to make the impact that is needed and we can say we already have. Our organization is solely funding by donations, sponsorships, and grants. We have built relationships with the Oregon Department of Education, Oregon Health Authority, Department of Human Services and Child Welfare, Oregon Food Bank, Project Access NOW, Kaiser, Oregon Health and Science University, Trillium Health Plan, Willamette Family Health, Papa Ola Lokahi, Bishop Estate Foundation, Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement, and the list goes on. These relationships come from the very teachings of our kupuna - ancestors. We believed in the Ahupuaʻa system and truly understood what it meant when they say it take a village to raise a child. Imagine raising a whole generation - we need a community. Our impact continues to come through our relationship and sharing the aloha spirit. Aloha is the true healer.

About the Organization:

KALO HCC is the right community to do this work because community and aloha is our foundation. Hawaiians, and all Pacific Islanders, understood the concept of community. Our people were voyagers and spent months at sea with no navigation tools but the stars. We are believers that nature is the true guide and when we listen the earth provides. We are the right people because who better to uplift and support the Pacific Islanders. Our impact can be measured by the relationships and collaborations we have built over the short three years we have been in existence. Although our mother organization, the Association of Hawaiian Civic Club, was founded over 100 years ago by Prince Jonah Kuhio Kalaniʻanaʻole, we are still young and have so much to learn. Many may wonder if we are able to make the impact that is needed and we can say we already have. Our organization is solely funding by donations, sponsorships, and grants. We have built relationships with the Oregon Department of Education, Oregon Health Authority, Department of Human Services and Child Welfare, Oregon Food Bank, Project Access NOW, Kaiser, Oregon Health and Science University, Trillium Health Plan, Willamette Family Health, Papa Ola Lokahi, Bishop Estate Foundation, Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement, and the list goes on. These relationships come from the very teachings of our kupuna - ancestors. We believed in the Ahupuaʻa system and truly understood what it meant when they say it take a village to raise a child. Imagine raising a whole generation - we need a community. Our impact continues to come through our relationship and sharing the aloha spirit. Aloha is the true healer.

organizational budget

$100,000 - $500,000

existence for

0-5 Years

The Issue:

Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders continue to forgotten or overshadowed because of the constant gap that has been created by our government. What does this mean? Letʻs take a look at one of the most recent events that hit our community the hardest, COVID-19. When COVID-19 hit as a pandemic, our community did not receive the resources or support because fortunately, and unfortunately, we are categorized as AAPI or API. Many have argued that many Pacific Islanders are also Asian and itʻs true, but our Pacific Islander community was overshadowed and underserved because of this. We understand that the pandemic hit all our communities hard, but our Pacific Islanders were dying at unheard of rates and no one noticed. When we were finally able to be "recognized" and receive support our health authority were made aware of this disparity. When we were invited to the table to speak with those who create and execute the policies that dictate our well being, they were in shock to learn how un-resourceful this country has been for our Pacific Islander community. KALO Hawaiian Civic Club would like to continue the work to desegregate AAPI or API. Both communities deserve to be seen individually because of the difference in need. Our youth are suffering in our school systems because they are not able to receive the right care and support. Our elderly cannot receive the care they need for the same reasons. Families are displaced and are not able to be supported because there are no culturally specific agencies for our needs. These issues continue to at the forefront of all that we do and the fight isnʻt easy. Both communities deserve to receive the care and resources that are specific to the community.

The Solution:

We believe that our communities will be able to thrive and better themselves in all areas with the right support. We are all striving for a thriving community. Hoʻoulu Lāhui - rebuilding community - has been our focus point in all that we have been doing. The solution is to better equip our community with resources that will uplift and create leaders. Build foundations and spaces that allow Pacific Islanders to see themselves and know that they are worthy. Community Resource Centers are made available to many BIPOC communities but there is one community that does not have this, Pacific Islanders. Yes, there are many API centers, community centers, resource centers, but our research shows that the percentage of support for Pacific Islanders are slim to none. Here in Oregon there are many API organizations. If granters took the time to seek where their funding was going, they wouldʻve found that the percentage of funding that is given to the Pacific Islander community is below 15%. We can also take a look at the staffing and consider the percentage of Pacific Islander voices that are represented at that level. Organizational boards who help govern these funds are also very limited in their Pacific Islander representation. How can we help this? Give our community the opportunity to walk into a room and see themselves. Understand that we want to embrace our Pacific Islander side and see ourselves in colleges, graduate schools, receiving our PhD, holding supervisor and manager positions because mentorship and training was made available to them as well and most of all, creating all of this for our youth. Segregating AAPI or API will be able to provide funding directly to organizations who focuses on the well being of our community. Like the many others, Pacific Islanders is a huge community to serve. Why are we grouped with another large community that also needs support?

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