PABNEEG

PABNEEG

The People’s Advisory Board for New Educational and Economic Goodwill is a Hmong-founded and run 501(c)(3) organization that works with low-to-no-income ethnic communities, with a focus on the local Colorado Hmong, AAPI, and BIPOC communities. Our goal is to provide educational and economic development to our local community to bring

PABNEEG

The People’s Advisory Board for New Educational and Economic Goodwill is a Hmong-founded and run 501(c)(3) organization that works with low-to-no-income ethnic communities, with a focus on the local Colorado Hmong, AAPI, and BIPOC communities. Our goal is to provide educational and economic development to our local community to bring social, cultural, educational, and economic change and use those experiences to establish meaningful and sustainable development for Hmong and other marginalized people in the community. Although our board members and CO-executive directors must be Hmong to adequately serve our community, we have created a diverse people's advisory board. This team is made up of a diverse group of people from all cultural backgrounds who lend a hand to promote the well-being of the local Hmong community and give our community the opportunity to contribute to theirs as well.

About the Organization:

The People’s Advisory Board for New Educational and Economic Goodwill is a Hmong-founded and run 501(c)(3) organization that works with low-to-no-income ethnic communities, with a focus on the local Colorado Hmong, AAPI, and BIPOC communities. Our goal is to provide educational and economic development to our local community to bring social, cultural, educational, and economic change and use those experiences to establish meaningful and sustainable development for Hmong and other marginalized people in the community. Although our board members and CO-executive directors must be Hmong to adequately serve our community, we have created a diverse people's advisory board. This team is made up of a diverse group of people from all cultural backgrounds who lend a hand to promote the well-being of the local Hmong community and give our community the opportunity to contribute to theirs as well.

organizational budget

$0 - $50,000

existence for

0-5 Years

Organization benefits AAPIs residing in the following state(s):

National • Alabama • Alaska • Arizona • Arkansas • California • Colorado • Connecticut • Delaware • District of Columbia • Florida • Georgia • Hawaii • Idaho • Illinois • Indiana • Iowa • Kansas • Kentucky • Louisiana • Maine • Maryland • Massachusetts • Michigan • Minnesota • Mississippi • Missouri • Montana • Nebraska • Nevada • New Hampshire • New Jersey • New Mexico • New York • North Carolina • North Dakota • Ohio • Oklahoma • Oregon • Pennsylvania • Puerto Rico • Rhode Island • South Carolina • South Dakota • Tennessee • Texas • Utah • Vermont • Virginia • Washington • West Virginia • Wisconsin • Wyoming

organizational budget

$0 - $50,000

existence for

0-5 Years

Organization benefits AAPIs residing in the following state(s):

National • Alabama • Alaska • Arizona • Arkansas • California • Colorado • Connecticut • Delaware • District of Columbia • Florida • Georgia • Hawaii • Idaho • Illinois • Indiana • Iowa • Kansas • Kentucky • Louisiana • Maine • Maryland • Massachusetts • Michigan • Minnesota • Mississippi • Missouri • Montana • Nebraska • Nevada • New Hampshire • New Jersey • New Mexico • New York • North Carolina • North Dakota • Ohio • Oklahoma • Oregon • Pennsylvania • Puerto Rico • Rhode Island • South Carolina • South Dakota • Tennessee • Texas • Utah • Vermont • Virginia • Washington • West Virginia • Wisconsin • Wyoming

The Issue:

Historically, the Hmong are peaceful neighbors who live alongside other groups but the other groups were not so peaceful in return. The Hmong are a Chinese minority with a long history. Even if the Hmong had peace, it did not last long. They were forced to migrate from northeastern China to the southwestern part of the country. Several major wars during the Qing Dynasty pushed hundreds of thousands of Hmong to Southeast Asian countries such as Vietnam, Laos, Burma and Thailand. Without a country of their own and a governing body to defend them they fell into several more conflicts that involved the Vietnamese, French, and Japanese. They fell victim to becoming a part of political parties sacrificing the lives of their men to defend those who would otherwise be persecuting them and their families. Due to the historical oppression of other groups, including Chinese, Japanese and Vietnamese, our community is hesitant to consult with them, collaborate or share resources with them. Generational trauma has caused our community to remain in "survival mode" limiting one's ability to thrive, as living in survival mode is founded in response to fear/trauma/scarcity. Thriving is possible when there is a developed sense and lived experience of safety and security, which people suffering from intergenerational trauma may not have a model knowledge or foundation for. Due to the lack of resources, the Hmong community in Colorado is dealing with language barriers/cultural awareness in the court system leading to an increased fear of government agencies. Asian hate crimes and discrimination in the courts are being underreported and not pursued due to the fear of increased costs associated with legal fees.

The Solution:

Strategic campaigns aimed to educate and build sustainable long-term partnerships and positive relationships with the local Hmong community and their local city and county government, court systems, law enforcement agencies, lawyers, health professionals, local NPOs, and other organizations. This will open opportunities to provide an understanding of the cultural values and beliefs of the Hmong furthering meaningful relationship building, increasing local resources including legal advocates, cultural advocates, and assisting in the long-term growth of the local Hmong community.

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