Parent-Child Relationship Association Inc

Parent-Child Relationship Association Inc

Empowering immigrant youth is the main focus of PCR. At PCR, we assist immigrant youth in Brooklyn to integrate into their community, access resources and services, and improve psychological well-being. Youth participate in PCR volunteer activities to build their capacity to help underserved BIPOC population in the community, advocate for

Parent-Child Relationship Association Inc

Empowering immigrant youth is the main focus of PCR. At PCR, we assist immigrant youth in Brooklyn to integrate into their community, access resources and services, and improve psychological well-being. Youth participate in PCR volunteer activities to build their capacity to help underserved BIPOC population in the community, advocate for immigrant rights, and organize events to bring change to the community. We evaluate our program outcome and success in several ways. We actively increase the visibility of our Asian immigrant communities at governmental and other platforms and demonstrate collective efforts in community building. PCR has received multiple awards and recognitions from government branches and officials for its effort to promote the health and well-being of the community. During the pandemic, PCR assisted over 10000 people in getting vaccination appointments in collaboration with the local hospital system and received $20 000 awards from the NYC Test & Trace Corps. In a park cleaning competition organized by NYC Park Department, PCR youth volunteers won the championship of the middle school group by collecting over 800 pounds of garbage. The founder of PCR, Xueqin Huang, received the Outstanding Dedication to the Thrive NYC-MHFA Initiative for her contribution to promoting mental health first aid training in 2019. PCR also was recognized by the New York Regional Census Center for accomplishment in increasing the self-response rate in their tract from 27.7% to 40% in the 2020 Census. We ensure that our organization provides services to address our community members' needs by collecting qualitative feedback and responses. We asked young volunteers to write down their feedback and what they learned about themselves and the communities. Youth participants appreciated the volunteer experiences that helped them overcome the isolation caused by COVID-19, transformed them from being timid to brave and confident talking to strangers, and bought a sense of accomplishment. Young volunteers said they overcame their weaknesses, expanded their social network, and received recognition from the community. Young Volunteers felt truly rewarded when they were able to use their language skills to help BIPOC immigrants to access liable information and services, which contributed to a united BIPOC community. Volunteers expressed their willingness to become social service providers in the future and serve their own community, which faces shortages of human service providers. Based on the feedback, we gradually build the programs to facilitate the integration of immigrant youth into the community, build their capacity, skills, and confidence, and promote learning in a supportive environment.

About the Organization:

Empowering immigrant youth is the main focus of PCR. At PCR, we assist immigrant youth in Brooklyn to integrate into their community, access resources and services, and improve psychological well-being. Youth participate in PCR volunteer activities to build their capacity to help underserved BIPOC population in the community, advocate for immigrant rights, and organize events to bring change to the community. We evaluate our program outcome and success in several ways. We actively increase the visibility of our Asian immigrant communities at governmental and other platforms and demonstrate collective efforts in community building. PCR has received multiple awards and recognitions from government branches and officials for its effort to promote the health and well-being of the community. During the pandemic, PCR assisted over 10000 people in getting vaccination appointments in collaboration with the local hospital system and received $20 000 awards from the NYC Test & Trace Corps. In a park cleaning competition organized by NYC Park Department, PCR youth volunteers won the championship of the middle school group by collecting over 800 pounds of garbage. The founder of PCR, Xueqin Huang, received the Outstanding Dedication to the Thrive NYC-MHFA Initiative for her contribution to promoting mental health first aid training in 2019. PCR also was recognized by the New York Regional Census Center for accomplishment in increasing the self-response rate in their tract from 27.7% to 40% in the 2020 Census. We ensure that our organization provides services to address our community members' needs by collecting qualitative feedback and responses. We asked young volunteers to write down their feedback and what they learned about themselves and the communities. Youth participants appreciated the volunteer experiences that helped them overcome the isolation caused by COVID-19, transformed them from being timid to brave and confident talking to strangers, and bought a sense of accomplishment. Young volunteers said they overcame their weaknesses, expanded their social network, and received recognition from the community. Young Volunteers felt truly rewarded when they were able to use their language skills to help BIPOC immigrants to access liable information and services, which contributed to a united BIPOC community. Volunteers expressed their willingness to become social service providers in the future and serve their own community, which faces shortages of human service providers. Based on the feedback, we gradually build the programs to facilitate the integration of immigrant youth into the community, build their capacity, skills, and confidence, and promote learning in a supportive environment.

organizational budget

$100,000 - $500,000

existence for

6-10 YEARS

The Issue:

We are a group immigrant parents living in the Sunset Park and Dyker Heights neighborhoods of Brooklyn, New York, two neighborhoods with a large percentage of immigrant residents who do not speak English. We organize our members to get involved in community service events, particularly events involving cleaning up the community streets and parks. Through our actions, we seek to promote social and community activism among immigrant community members and help deepen bond between parents and children by having them engage in actions together. Also, we want to inspire other immigrants to get involved in the community and improve the environment that we live in.

The Solution:

We aim to represent the Asian immigrant community in New York City, make the immigrant youth and family's voices heard, promote youth empowerment and positive development, and unite the Asian immigrant community to bring change. We achieve the goals through family support, social services, community engagement, holiday event, civil engagement, youth LEAP program, and mental health awareness workshops. Empowering immigrant youth is the main focus of PCR. At PCR, we assist immigrant youth in Brooklyn to integrate into their community, access resources and services, and improve psychological well-being. Youth participate in PCR volunteer activities to build their capacity to help underserved BIPOC population in the community, advocate for immigrant rights, and organize events to bring change to the community. We have provided volunteer experiences for youth in immigrant families to plan and lead events, conduct community outreach, tutor after-school programs for younger children, clean parks, help with food distribution, and clerical work, which improve their social skills and improve integration into the larger community. We plan to offer a teen leadership training program, which contains a series of workshops starting this summer. This leadership training program aims to improve problem-solving skills, strengthen language use, communication, and expression, promote relationship-building and collaboration, enhance identity and participation as community members, to strengthen confidence and leadership. These programs help immigrant youth acquire skills and confidence to contribute to the community they live in. We also conduct social services, educational events, and advocacy activities among parents and families and improved civil participation among the Chinese immigrant communities. We particularly address the needs of "satellite babies". Culturally / linguistically appropriate social services to meet the needs of the growing BIPOC immigrant populations. We train immigrant youth who can speak multiple languages to provide benefit applications and case assistance. We also provide a variety of educational activities to improve health literacy and language proficiency. We educate families and youth on health and mental health literacy and parenting skills and disseminate knowledge on improving the family relationship and well-being of youth.

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