PCRC

PCRC

Peninsula Conflict Resolution Center (PCRC) was established in 1986 by a small group of community members with a desire to address problems and disputes impacting local neighborhoods. PCRC began by listening, mediating, and working with residents to co-create solutions. Over the decades PCRC became deeply embedded in San Mateo County

PCRC

Peninsula Conflict Resolution Center (PCRC) was established in 1986 by a small group of community members with a desire to address problems and disputes impacting local neighborhoods. PCRC began by listening, mediating, and working with residents to co-create solutions. Over the decades PCRC became deeply embedded in San Mateo County - being called upon to facilitate complex mediations between community members and families, within jails and schools, and between law and enforcement and residents - helping to restore trust and reduce violence. Since our inception, we have grown to serve over 28,000 residents across San Mateo county - expanding our theory of change to enable us to urgently respond to conflicts and problems that arise, while simultaneously approaching problems with a more macro, preventative, and systems-change approach. What has remained as a core principle of our work, stemming from our roots in community conflict resolution, is our deep commitment to our people. We center our community when identifying needs and designing interventions - the lived experience of our elders, our leaders and our community members, informs everything that we do. In fact, the majority of our staff are former participants, residents and volunteers - we come from, and are deeply rooted in, the communities we serve. This makes us skilled at bringing a lens of cultural humility to all of our partnerships, allowing us to lead through empathy and to ensure that there is equity and inclusion embedded at every stage of the process.

About the Organization:

Peninsula Conflict Resolution Center (PCRC) was established in 1986 by a small group of community members with a desire to address problems and disputes impacting local neighborhoods. PCRC began by listening, mediating, and working with residents to co-create solutions. Over the decades PCRC became deeply embedded in San Mateo County - being called upon to facilitate complex mediations between community members and families, within jails and schools, and between law and enforcement and residents - helping to restore trust and reduce violence. Since our inception, we have grown to serve over 28,000 residents across San Mateo county - expanding our theory of change to enable us to urgently respond to conflicts and problems that arise, while simultaneously approaching problems with a more macro, preventative, and systems-change approach. What has remained as a core principle of our work, stemming from our roots in community conflict resolution, is our deep commitment to our people. We center our community when identifying needs and designing interventions - the lived experience of our elders, our leaders and our community members, informs everything that we do. In fact, the majority of our staff are former participants, residents and volunteers - we come from, and are deeply rooted in, the communities we serve. This makes us skilled at bringing a lens of cultural humility to all of our partnerships, allowing us to lead through empathy and to ensure that there is equity and inclusion embedded at every stage of the process.

organizational budget

$1 MILLION - $2 MILLION

existence for

26-30 YEARS

Organization benefits AAPIs residing in the following state(s):

National • New York

organizational budget

$1 MILLION - $2 MILLION

existence for

26-30 YEARS

Organization benefits AAPIs residing in the following state(s):

National • New York

The Issue:

In 2017, PCRC conducted the first disaggregated needs assessment for the Pacific Islander community in San Mateo County. The assessment included surveys, focus groups and an advisory council dedicated to identifying the top three issues/barriers to success for PI individuals and communities: Health. In one of our town hall meetings we asked people to raise their hands if they had, or knew someone who had, diabetes. Everyone’s hand went up. Our PI community has the highest rate of mortality (caused by obesity, hypertension, and type II diabetes) in the county. Due to distrust and lack of culturally appropriate services, people were scared to get tested, especially for type II diabetes. Those who were didn’t understand how to access the care they needed. What’s more, our PI community suffers from violence - hate-based violence (Anti-Asian hate crimes grew by 420% from 2019 to 2020), police violence, gang/turf violence and domestic violence (exacerbated by mental health issues). All are under-reported and under-acknowledged.  Education. Only one in five NHPI Californians (22%) aged 25-64 has a bachelor’s degree. That number is lower for Fijian (19%), Laotian (19%), Samoan (19%) and Tongan (14%). At the time of our disaggregated needs assessment, parents were concerned about the high school drop-out rate.  Financial Instability. San Mateo County, while holding tremendous wealth, resources, and opportunity for some, it also plays host to some of the most dramatic income inequality in the region. Generations of structural racism made San Mateo County the 9th most racially disparate county in California, with drastic contrasts cutting across critical domains such as economic opportunity, healthcare, education and civic engagement. Unfortunately, only a small homogenous segment of city and neighborhood members typically participate in local government decisions.

The Solution:


Health We created the Pacific Islanders Health Ambassadors Program (PIHAP) to respond to the three community defined needs. The PIHAP educates our community about the most prevalent health problems, about how to receive services, and enrolls people into MediCal and entitlements. We have also partnered with San Mateo County BHRS Office of Diversity & Equity, PCRC to create the Pacific Islander Initiative Program to promote health, wellness and awareness within the Pacific Islander community through strengths based approaches. We also help to build the capacity of local Pacific Islander leaders through training, dialogue and celebrated successes. Education In response to disparities in educational attainment, we created MANA. MANA is a NHPI term that embodies spiritual power - the program is intentionally designed to empower NHPI students by strengthening quality educational and support services to promote and foster student learning, sense of belonging, success, and self-advocacy. We help students of Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander descent succeed in their academic journey while integrating their cultural identity into the process.  Equity [Addressing Financial Instability] Our year-long Neighborhood Academy develops leaders and helps them self-advocate and navigate systems of power. We help to empower residents, who are typically disconnected or disenfranchised from civic engagement, to become civic leaders and participate alongside systems’ stakeholders in the justice system, local government, school administration, district administration, and county services. We host coalition meetings and develop and implement community led ‘neighborhood vibrancy plans’ - we define community needs, interventions, and perfect our service provisions. Working from within the community, ideas generated will be culturally appropriate, impactful in practice (not just in theory), and be implemented with empathy and care. PCRC elevates AAPI community engagement (for buy-in/higher impact/better outcomes) by co-hosting community centered events that uplift AAPI culture, create pathways for cross-cultural understanding and solidarity, and model vibrancy.  Our Pacific Islander Violence Prevention Conference brings together community members and leaders, elders, representative community/health service providers, researchers, and law enforcement to discuss issues and solutions to violence and other problems facing the PI community.  The event includes testimonials, research/data in ‘real’ numbers, panels, workshops and speakers.

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