SAADA

SAADA

SAADA creates a more just future by sharing stories of the nearly 5.4 million South Asian Americans, so that struggles of past and current generations for inclusion and belonging are not the same struggles we leave to the next generation. Since its founding in 2008, SAADA has enabled artists, filmmakers,

SAADA

SAADA creates a more just future by sharing stories of the nearly 5.4 million South Asian Americans, so that struggles of past and current generations for inclusion and belonging are not the same struggles we leave to the next generation. Since its founding in 2008, SAADA has enabled artists, filmmakers, journalists, scholars, students, and community members to create new content and shape public understanding about our community. SAADA’s archive is the largest publicly accessible collection of stories about South Asian American experiences. Through our participatory model, SAADA reimagines the possibilities of community-driven storytelling in the digital era.

About the Organization:

SAADA creates a more just future by sharing stories of the nearly 5.4 million South Asian Americans, so that struggles of past and current generations for inclusion and belonging are not the same struggles we leave to the next generation. Since its founding in 2008, SAADA has enabled artists, filmmakers, journalists, scholars, students, and community members to create new content and shape public understanding about our community. SAADA’s archive is the largest publicly accessible collection of stories about South Asian American experiences. Through our participatory model, SAADA reimagines the possibilities of community-driven storytelling in the digital era.

organizational budget

$100,000 - $500,000

existence for

11-15 YEARS

The Issue:

In February 2017, Srinivas Kuchibhotla, an Indian immigrant in Kansas, was murdered by a white supremacist who told him to “get out” of the country. This refrain to “get out” is one heard repeatedly by South Asian Americans and reflects the sense of immigrants of color being cast as perpetual outsiders. South Asian Americans have been a presence in the United States for more than 130 years. Today, there are nearly 5.4 million South Asian Americans, comprising 2% of the U.S. population and more than a quarter of the Asian American community. Yet, most Americans know nothing of our community’s long, rich, and diverse history. The stark reality is that traditional cultural institutions contribute to our marginalization, as our community’s stories fall outside of their collecting interests. If we do not act now, there is a danger of our stories not only continuing to be unheard, but being lost entirely.

The Solution:

SAADA has recently completed our most ambitious project to date, the publication of Our Stories: An Introduction to South Asian America , a new book for high school and college-aged readers. Our Stories is a nearly 500-page testament to our community’s belonging. Containing essays from sixty-four contributors—including a wide range of scholars, artists, journalists, and community members— Our Stories also includes hundreds of inset stories and images that provide additional dimensions to the narratives of South Asian Americans. In its scope, ambitions, and reach, this volume is truly one-of-a-kind. With a Gold Futures grant, SAADA will create resources to connect Our Stories with readers, parents, and educators, including a monthly book club, parent conference, resources for K-12 teachers, and collaborations with artists on children’s books for preschoolers. In doing so, SAADA will ensure that young South Asian Americans, for the first time, see themselves reflected in the American story.

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