Taiko Community Alliance

Taiko Community Alliance

Taiko Community Alliance (TCA) empowers the people and advances the art of taiko, which is a percussive performing art with traditional roots in Japan. We are an organization run by the people we serve: taiko artists and enthusiasts promoting heritage, creativity, inclusivity, identity and activism through drumming. We do

Taiko Community Alliance

Taiko Community Alliance (TCA) empowers the people and advances the art of taiko, which is a percussive performing art with traditional roots in Japan. We are an organization run by the people we serve: taiko artists and enthusiasts promoting heritage, creativity, inclusivity, identity and activism through drumming. We do this by providing resources, collecting and sharing data, and hosting taiko gatherings like the North American Taiko Conference (NATC). Our newest program, TaikoStories, will showcase the marginalized voices of our community and also retain them digitally as an ongoing oral histories collection on our website.

About the Organization:

Taiko Community Alliance (TCA) empowers the people and advances the art of taiko, which is a percussive performing art with traditional roots in Japan. We are an organization run by the people we serve: taiko artists and enthusiasts promoting heritage, creativity, inclusivity, identity and activism through drumming. We do this by providing resources, collecting and sharing data, and hosting taiko gatherings like the North American Taiko Conference (NATC). Our newest program, TaikoStories, will showcase the marginalized voices of our community and also retain them digitally as an ongoing oral histories collection on our website.

organizational budget

$100,000 - $500,000

existence for

6-10 YEARS

The Issue:

Taiko came to North America on the west coast during the 1960s. In just fifty years, it has spread to all of the U.S., Canada, Europe, South America, and beyond. The 2020 Taiko Census estimated that over 9,000 taiko players/artists reside around the world. COVID-19 and recent acts of racial violence against the AAPI community has shown that taiko has been, and continues to be, a vehicle through which we can shape our history, our identity, and our culture. While the stories of founders and primary thought leaders of North American taiko have been documented, our community is much more extensive. So even though our history is a niche facet of the larger Japanese American (JA) experience, we have voices that have become marginalized in our work. We can be more inclusive, and we can do better at featuring other perspectives to our history.

The Solution:

Like many cultural arts traditions, our artform will not be sustainable if we do not document taiko’s history. Moreover, if that history does not feature all the voices in our community, then we have effectively whitewashed part of our rich culture. We plan to remedy this issue by creating a new program called TaikoStories. It will be an archive of oral stories that captures our history (and possibly our future) through the lived experiences of voices often not heard in the taiko community. Voices that speak of Asian identity, honoring tradition, embracing evolution, and sharing culture versus appropriating it.

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