The Flavor Continues

The Flavor Continues

The Flavor Continues is a nonprofit organization that serves the street and club dance community by hosting dance events, a community center, providing classes, consultation, serving in the public school system through social emotional learning via these dance forms, and advocacy for our community. We believe in a multi-pronged approach

The Flavor Continues

The Flavor Continues is a nonprofit organization that serves the street and club dance community by hosting dance events, a community center, providing classes, consultation, serving in the public school system through social emotional learning via these dance forms, and advocacy for our community. We believe in a multi-pronged approach in fulfilling the mission of bringing economic equality, social justice, and unity to our rich, BIPOC community.

About the Organization:

The Flavor Continues is a nonprofit organization that serves the street and club dance community by hosting dance events, a community center, providing classes, consultation, serving in the public school system through social emotional learning via these dance forms, and advocacy for our community. We believe in a multi-pronged approach in fulfilling the mission of bringing economic equality, social justice, and unity to our rich, BIPOC community.

organizational budget

$100,000 - $500,000

existence for

0-5 Years

The Issue:

We are looking to address the lack of wellbeing and community based opportunities catered towards marginalized AAPI groups. We define "marginalized AAPI groups" as individuals excluded from mainstream social, economic, educational, and/or cultural definition of AAPI. This includes individuals in low-income, adverse living situations, central and southeast Asians, and so forth. "AAPI" covers a wide range of demographics. For example, Mongolians (25%) had the highest poverty rates among Asian groups, 12% above the national average, while Indians has the lowest. Households headed by Burmese Americans, for example, had lower incomes ($44,400) compared to Taiwanese ($102,405). AAPI live in various spaces including low-income neighborhoods as well as high-income neighborhoods. It's important to acknowledge that there is strong difference in experience between various AAPI groups. And the marginalized AAPI groups often live in the poorer and unsafe parts of the cities and face overwhelming disparities. These marginalized AAPI often gravitate towards practices of liberation since this is closer to the surrounding communities cultures. This includes dance forms such as break dancing, fighting styles such as capoeira, or hip hop inspired art (street wear, graffiti, rap, etc.). The AAPI community has long used these forms to find their voices and expressions - Dumbfoundead, MC Jin, Anderson Paak, to list a few. As we move towards solving the various forms of trauma our communities face, it's these methods of self expression that has helped us overcome our struggles. However, these types of artistry are often less supported and seen as "lesser" forms compared to the fine arts such as ballet, modern, or painting. While you can receive a degree in ballet or violin performance, it's impossible to receive a degree in hip-hop or street art. In a series of Space Interviews we conducted with our community, our AAPI members noted that this community was important to them in various ways. Some responses were "It was the first space I could be powerful... [and watching] other Bgirls inspired me", "It's MY space of celebration", "it helped me escape the stress [of being premed]", and "a community [they were] always looking for, but never could find."

The Solution:

We are looking to solve the lack of wellbeing and community based opportunities catered towards marginalized AAPI groups by providing the libration practice of street and club dance in a community space. The phrase “Street and Club dance” is an umbrella term including but not limited to Breaking, Popping, Locking, House, Krump, Uprocking, Hip Hop Freestyle, Waacking, and many others. These freestyle-based art forms provide a foundation of movement that allow dancers to interpret music in the moment, allowing them to find cathartic moments of release. Street and Club dance forms were born out of oppression as expressions of liberation. Started by Black culture, and heavily influenced and shaped by those of other BIPOC and LGBTQ+ identities, it's become a diverse community. Our organization looks to provide community space (25 hours per week), events, competitions, and cultural education. Our community space serves as an affordable (sliding scale) incubator for the community, where dancers can come, network, practice, and exchange knowledge with one another. Our events and competitions are spaces where dancers. Our education portion looks like semester long programming for MIT, Northeastern, and other one time workshops provided by the elders in our community. We also teach social emotional learning through these art forms in the Boston Public Schools System. Our approach is unique in that we create a full pathway for an individual to be a part of the community and harness their craft. For example, we first start exposing students to the art form and culture through the classes. They then come to our community space to practice what they learned in class. They talk with and learn from more experienced practitioners, seek mentorship, and build personal relationships with the community. They then can enter competitions and events to test their skills and participate in battle culture. Through these relationships and experiences, individuals work to surpass their own barriers such as confidence, self identity, and so forth, in order to elevate their craft.

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