War Legacies Project

War Legacies Project

WLP is a global NGO that helps many in Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia, as well as in the U.S., including veterans, to overcome ongoing legacies of Vietnam War-era use of Agent Orange and Explosive Remnants of War.

War Legacies Project

WLP is a global NGO that helps many in Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia, as well as in the U.S., including veterans, to overcome ongoing legacies of Vietnam War-era use of Agent Orange and Explosive Remnants of War.

About the Organization:

WLP is a global NGO that helps many in Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia, as well as in the U.S., including veterans, to overcome ongoing legacies of Vietnam War-era use of Agent Orange and Explosive Remnants of War.

organizational budget

$0 - $50,000

existence for

11-15 YEARS

The Issue:

Between 1961 and 1971, the U.S. sprayed 12 million gallons of Dioxin-contaminated Agent Orange, in addition to 8 million gallons of other herbicides, on Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia—an average of 5,200 gallons a day for 3,735 days. By the end of Operation Ranch Hand in 1971, nearly 20,000 sorties had been flown. In total, more than 66,000 square miles of South Vietnam, along with large areas of Laos and parts of Cambodia, were impacted. Since 2008, WLP has led in-depth medical investigations, relief programs and strategic interventions for those suffering from a health consequence of U.S. wartime spraying of herbicides. WLP has also published a full report on survey findings in Laos, specifically, to be sent to U.S. government agencies and officials, to advocate policy-oriented reconciliation and healing for those in the homeland and in the diaspora here in the U.S.

The Solution:

War Legacies Project’s founding philosophy is that there is a moral, ethical and humanitarian obligation of countries that wage war to take responsibility for the immediate and long-term impacts of those wars on individuals, society and the environment. We hold to this even if these impacts are not immediately known and even if they develop decades after wars have ended. Our goals are to gather even more indisputable proof of the injuries still emerging from American herbicide spraying that took place more than five decades ago, to convince the public and relevant governments about the long-term health, environmental, societal, psychological, economic and cultural costs of war; to foster discussions about the obligations of countries that wage wars to address these long-term impacts; and to provide direct assistance to heal affected individuals and communities worldwide.

Get Updates about the Gold Futures Challenge

Join our email list to receive challenge updates!